Dr Jack: Calcuttas Pavement Doctor

ISBN 13: 9780747508908
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  • Meet Jack Preger, the Pavement Doctor Who Serves Kolkata's Poorest.
  • DOCTOR JACK – AT THE BBC.
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More information about this seller Contact this seller. Light rubbing wear to cover, spine and page edges. Very minimal writing or notations in margins not affecting the text. Possible clean ex-library copy, with their stickers and or stamp s. Seller Inventory Book Description Bloomsbury, London, Hard Cover. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good. First Edition. Used book. Small mark on inner back cover. No inscrips. Photographs illustrator.

First Edition, First Impression. Dust jacket complete, unclipped slight wear to edges.

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Black cloth with bright gilt titling on spine. Previous owners inscription on f.

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I believe you began as what we call a pavement doctor so you were treating people under a flyover is that right? My hopes rested mainly on the efforts of Safdar Hashmi, the eminent theatre artist who was then also working in this office. I was born in Hightown, Coronation Street! In the backstreets of Calcutta, shielded from the scorching sun by a tattered tarpaulin, mothers clutching semi-conscious, emaciated babies, and adults and children with missing or gangrenous limbs or suffering from tuberculosis or leprosy, queue in their hundreds to see Dr Jack Preger. The clinic has survived for over a decade, in spite of official disapproval, and will soon be ministering to its 20,th family. About Jeremy Josephs. This website uses cookies to improve user experience.

In the backstreets of Calcutta, shielded from the scorching sun by a tattered tarpaulin, mothers clutching semi-conscious, emaciated babies, and adults and children with missing or gangrenous limbs or suffering from tuberculosis or leprosy, queue in their hundreds to see Dr Jack Preger. On a stretch of pavement measuring two metres by thirty he runs a unique clinic. His patients are the destitute and the dispossessed, those who live and die on the streets. The clinic has survived for over a decade, in spite of official disapproval, and will soon be ministering to its 20,th family.

Born and brought up in an orthodox Jewish family near Manchester, as a young adult Preger converted to Catholicism. In he qualified as a doctor and immediately left to set up a clinic in Bangladesh. Seven years later he was expelled after exposing a government-masterminded racket involving the illegal export of babies for adoption.

Undeterred, he set off again the following year to begin his now legendary work in Calcutta. Preger is a man of paradox. To the West Bengali authorities, he is an embarrassment and a nuisance, continually campaigning against official corruption, permanently awaiting trial for practising without a licence, and vowing to fight the threatened closure of his clinic and resist deportation even at the risk of imprisonment.

Dr. Jack: Calcutta's Pavement Doctor

A self-confessed manic depressive, Preger relies on his work to sustain him. His two broken marriages - and two deserted children - bespeak a turbulent personal life which he finds difficult to reconcile with his reputation as a paragon of virtue. He has dedicated his life to the people in the east Indian city. You were born in Manchester, I want to get your thoughts about what happened on Monday evening.

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I was born in Hightown, Coronation Street! Manchester, a long, long time ago. I never broke the old connection with Manchester. I grew up there, went to school there and when I heard this dreadful news it reminded me so much of the Second World War.

Dr Jack: Calcutta's Pavement Doctor

I was in every blitz in the city and I remember the casualty figures going up outside Cheetham Hill Road public library and the horror with which we looked for names of people we knew; and I understand so well what fellow Mancunians are going through now and they have my deepest sympathy. What we were hearing in the immediate aftermath families looking for their children and the names of people, we are still in the process of finding out the names of those - that horrific feeling as a parent, not knowing what has happened to your loved ones.

And then there are no many aspects to this tragedy. And the mainstream in this country is something that we should all be very proud of. Just to continue with that, you come from an absolute position of knowledge and experience because you have been working in Calcutta and you treat the poor people in Calcutta. We want you to tell us how you got to that point.

It was a long journey. In fits and starts. I had a kind of intimation, an epiphany, or whatever you want to call it, that I had to become a doctor.

It was completely crazy. I had been spreading cow-manure on one of the top fields in the farm and that seemed a strange thing to happen. But it became a fixed idea in my mind. I applied to go to medical school and managed to get in by some miracle at 35 years old; and felt I had to go to a Third World country. There was an appeal for nurses and doctors to go to Bangladesh. I worked there from to when I was deported. I believe you began as what we call a pavement doctor so you were treating people under a flyover is that right? I had a very normal existence in Bangladesh, I had a bed in-patient facility and two farms, as well, for pavement dwellers and abandoned children, children abandoned in the famine.

I came from that to nothing in Calcutta, very little funding. The Marian Fathers in the US helped initially. I had no surgery, no place to work so I worked on the streets for some years. I did pick up some Bengali language in Bangladesh over seven years. The thing was I picked up the street Bengali, the street accent of Dhaka town so that when I came to Calcutta people who had emigrated - Hindus came across in partition - from Dhaka immediately recognised I had come from Bangladesh by my Bengali accent.

And the people living on the streets, many of them were migrants from Bangladesh so we had a common language.

Calcutta's Pavement Doctor

In the backstreets of Calcutta, shielded from the scorching sun by a tattered Dr Jack. Calcutta's Pavement Doctor. By: Jeremy Josephs Media of Dr Jack. In the backstreets of Calcutta, shielded from the scorching sun by a tattered tarpaulin, mothers clutching semi-conscious, emaciated babies, and adults and.

But of course my Bengali and their Bengali were not quite on the same level. You then went on to establish a clinic and then Calcutta Rescue; can you tell me a little about what Calcutta Rescue does? Photographs illustrator.

First Edition, First Impression. Dust jacket complete, unclipped slight wear to edges. Black cloth with bright gilt titling on spine. Previous owners inscription on f. In the backstreets of Calcutta, shielded from the scorching sun by a tattered tarpaulin, mothers clutching semi-conscious, emaciated babies, and adults and children with missing or gangrenous limbs or suffering from tuberculosis or leprosy, queue in their hundreds to see Dr Jack Preger.

On a stretch of pavement measuring two metres by thirty he runs a unique clinic.

About Dr Jack

His patients are the destitute and the dispossessed, those who live and die on the streets. The clinic has survived for over a decade, in spite of official disapproval, and will soon be ministering to its 20,th family. Born and brought up in an orthodox Jewish family near Manchester, as a young adult Preger converted to Catholicism. In he qualified as a doctor and immediately left to set up a clinic in Bangladesh. Seven years later he was expelled after exposing a government-masterminded racket involving the illegal export of babies for adoption.

Undeterred, he set off again the following year to begin his now legendary work in Calcutta. Preger is a man of paradox. To the West Bengali authorities, he is an embarrassment and a nuisance, continually campaigning against official corruption, permanently awaiting trial for practising without a licence, and vowing to fight the threatened closure of his clinic and resist deportation even at the risk of imprisonment. A self-confessed manic depressive, Preger relies on his work to sustain him. His two broken marriages - and two deserted children - bespeak a turbulent personal life which he finds difficult to reconcile with his reputation as a paragon of virtue.

A lot of the things that people imagine about someone like myself are just projected fantasies. The fact is that I happen to work with poor people. To me it's the most natural thing in the world. Book Description Bloomsbury Books, London, Black paper on board cover, illustrated d. Condition: UsedAcceptable. Used book.

Small mark on inner back cover. No inscrips. Jeremy Josephs Dr.