Left by the Indians: Story of My Life

Stories Of 10 Indians Who Left The City Behind For A Quieter Life
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You still sleep alone. I got sick of it. I was too dependent on my friends for happiness that was evasive. Soon, with age, friends started falling off the grid after they got married. Does marriage bring happiness in America? So I moved out of the suburbs.

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Moving to the dense city of San Francisco changed that feeling of sickness. There was a lot I could do on my own. Life was better. I could run on the beautiful Embarcadero Road next to the bay, watch the twinkling lights of the Bay Bridge, and eat real Mexican food. I no longer spent my life in a car, and could walk to the shopping centre, or take a bustling train to any part of the city. But that life soon got exhausting. The high rent I paid meant that I had to save money on other things.

I would return home at pm from a tiring bus ride from office, only to spend 45 minutes washing the stained vessels dumped in the sink. The pleasant work of writing and photography, the will power-consuming work of exercise, and the unwanted children of cleaning, cooking, organising, and folding, seemed to eat into all the free time I had.

And then, exhausted, I filled up the rest of my time with the brainless task of resting with Netflix. I hired a helper from Taskrabbit. The relief was short-lived. I could not afford to hire help and I woke up every morning with an emptiness in my heart. I woke up wondering what my purpose in the US was. I woke up missing India.

Over three years in the city of San Fransico, I slowly and surely became obsessed. I worked hard for the Indian Google Network, my only easy outlet. I created a proposal called Dharti , tried for a tie up with an Indian Institute of Technology, tried to get an impact fund sponsorship. Nothing went though. I tried again. A job is the reason to stay in America?

That moment, a seed was planted. Though it has not been used for her disease, she sees it as her last hope, applies and is accepted. Accompanied by her parents, sh After years of symptoms, of being misdiagnosed, even by the reknown Mayo Clinic, Amy finally gets a diagnosis. Accompanied by her parents, she flies from California to Delhi, a whole new and strange world. I enjoyed the way this story was told, naturally, as if she were having a conversation face to face.

Her past, her pains, the treatments and medicines that didn't work, her fears and her hope that this will work. The descriptions of India, the street scene, the busyness, the market, the food, all so strange and loud in the beginning, but embraced by the end. Her parents were wonderful, supporting, funny, though her dad suffers from depression, he is fully supportive of his daughter, enamored still of his wife. This is the best type of mrmoir, well told, relateable to those of us who suffer various issues. A good message to remember to never give up, there may be something out there. If not now, maybe in the future.

ARC from Edelweiss View all 16 comments. Quite good. Q: In the past, I would have been more self-conscious about something like this, but some of my modesty has faded. Now I look at my body and I think, I cannot believe it has survived so much. This perspective is a beautiful thing.

I wish I had found it earlier than now. I feel this out in the city, but even more so in the wild uncertainty of my own unsteady heart. The answer that comes surprises me. It feels necessary c Q: What I discover is this: Our physical bodies are the sum of our lives. Our lives are the sum of our thoughts, beliefs, and emotions. When we suppress our emotions, it can create stress on the physical body, causing emotions to show up as physical symptoms.

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September 12, [1]. With a strange warmth in my heart and swiftness in my feet, I climbed over the first hill, and soon the second one. I was sent into the kitchen to mash the turnips for dinner. In the end, she says that she had to heal in ways she hadnt even known had existed. Rising at once and carrying their blankets across one shoulder, they flocked leisurely from their various wigwams toward our dwelling. I threw myself upon the bed, and, closing my eyes, forgot my good intention. American Indian Stories.

This is how our body communicates with us, by using its very own language. I am afraid of my feelings. I am buried under them. And this has caused me to stifle my humanness—which, it turns out, is percent of what I am made of. It is impossible to be me, like this. What I realize next is that I have needed illness. It is easier to be sick than to try to be perfect. It is easier to be sick and buried under emotions than to feel them.

I am more relaxed. I start being kinder to myself. When I make a mistake, I forget about it. When I call myself a name, I stop. When I am upset, I share it, even though showing my insides is still not easy for me to do. Maybe most important, I am getting so good at being with my feelings. I do not ignore and persist. I listen. And I do it without too much judgment. I am becoming me. But you must take it all as necessary steps and proceed.

Keep asking the questions that point to the truth of who you are. When you hear the answers, listen. This is how you own your story. This is how you transform who you think you should be into who you really are. This is how you do it. This is how you save your life. Great things happen behind the scenes of our lives, often long before they become clear enough to actually see. Scher There are many quotable statements that are so eloquently made throughout this book by Amy B. Scher opens the doors, the windows, the crawl spaces, and the attic for the reader into her life and how she went from a sick young woman, to a woman with conviction and faith.

Scher brings to us her story of making a choice, and following through with it.

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This is not a w Great things happen behind the scenes of our lives, often long before they become clear enough to actually see. This is not a whine party about how anybody should pity her for having a chronic illness, it is also not a sermon on why you should do just as she did and you too can find salvation.

It is, an honest account of a process, that is shared in a refreshing way. The book is segmented into three distinct parts. Part I focuses on some background information and the reasons why Scher decided to share her story.

Stories Of 10 Indians Who Left The City Behind For A Quieter Life - Homegrown

Part II, the main section is a personal journal via actual blog posts that allow us to walk with Scher on her journey. Part III is a nice wrap up, with some final thoughts. Each section is well written, and packs that proverbial punch, but in a truly refreshing way.

Scher opens your eyes to new possibilities, as her eyes open to them. She brings you into her soul as she travels the bumps in the road, and the smooth sailing moments. As someone who also suffers from a chronic illness this book was especially poignant for me, as I begin a new year with no new answers, but doctor appointments to come.

I want to be able to brave these days to come with even half the strength that Scher had as she made a very difficult decision to try a radical medical solution that many would not agree with, and many fight for the end of such actions. Bravo to Scher for Being strong enough to travel this road. Have faith to try something new. Share your story so others can learn. Get better, and share your hope. I related to the stories since I accompanied my husband on a journey to the same clinic in India.

Amy tells it like it is with humor, love and hope. View 2 comments. Jul 31, Vivek Tejuja rated it really liked it. Scher traveled to India for bold and controversial stem-cell treatments for her advanced Lyme disease after exhausting all options back home in the US of A.

She had nearly spent a decade trying to find, research and even underwent several treatments, but no avail. She took a leap of faith and decided to travel all the way to India for a treatment - that could work or not. This book is about her life, her battles, her life in India and how she found a way to deal with every hindrance life threw a Scher traveled to India for bold and controversial stem-cell treatments for her advanced Lyme disease after exhausting all options back home in the US of A.

This book is about her life, her battles, her life in India and how she found a way to deal with every hindrance life threw at her. I normally do not read books in this genre.

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Either they do not appeal to me or I get scared of breaking down while reading them. I do not know exactly why, but this time I allowed myself to weep and loved the read. This is most certainly not the typical sickness to health kind of book. In fact, how it is different is because Scher takes us through the journey with her and how she emerges as a more confident and independent person.

If you ask me personally it had nothing to do with the country as much as it had to do with Scher. Having said that, the book chronicles India like never before to me as well. The subtitle for this book is "A true story of embryonic stem cells, Indian adventures, and ultimate self-healing. I was fascinated at the Say what you will about the controversy over using embryonic stem cells - when you are in so much pain you don't know how you will live the next moment in time - you grasp for anything that offers hope.

I applaud Amy for her bravery and cheer for her recovery! I highly recommend it! I bought this book hoping to gain some insight into dealing more successfully with chronic Lyme disease. I was not disappointed. I was inspired by Amy Scher's determination to do whatever it took to get well. It took her a while to embrace her Indian doctor's belief that she had the power to heal herself.

When she finally knew this to be true, she was able heal. The author's life seems to have been changed forever by her healing journey. I appreciate all of the insights she shared about how she I bought this book hoping to gain some insight into dealing more successfully with chronic Lyme disease. I appreciate all of the insights she shared about how she accomplished this healing of body, mind, emotions, and spirit. She now offers energy therapy for emotional healing. I have worked with her once via the phone. She was very insightful and kind.

I plan to work with her more. Apr 10, Micheal rated it it was amazing Shelves: own. I personally suffer from Trigeminal Neuralgia a chronic illness so reading Amy's story about advanced late-stage Lyme disease and her battle to travel across the United States to end up on the other side of the world in India in the hopes that the experimental research stem-cell to help her is truly inspirational and pretty accurate on what a person goes through when they feel like there is no hope I must say that this is not my usual genre of literature, but Thank You Goodreads for the ARC.

One must find the acceptance of healing from within in order to be truly healed and I believe Amy has done that. Thank you for sharing story. You are a true warrior. Jun 17, amanda rated it liked it.

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However, by the end, there are a few things that make someone like me who has lived with chronic illness for 17 years completely enraged. Jan 13, Jane rated it really liked it Shelves: autobio-bio-memoir , book-club-cook-book-wins. Thanks to Book Club Cookbook and Gallery books.

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Imagine living a life without knowing what undiagnosed condition you had. Amy had Lyme disease and she was misdiagnosed so many times and so many tests in so many renowned medical facilities that she practically gave up until she went to India to get stem cell transplants. This was her last hope and it was successful in many ways; not only in her illness but in learning the way that these people live and the Indian food that she never enjoyed living Thanks to Book Club Cookbook and Gallery books.

This was her last hope and it was successful in many ways; not only in her illness but in learning the way that these people live and the Indian food that she never enjoyed living in the U.

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Her parents were supportive in going with her and her Jewish mother is so cool especially getting her nose pierced my Jewish mother wasn't this cool and her father was a source of support even with his own problems. I loved her family and how supportive they were in every way. I laughed some, I cried some. My emotions were all over the place.

Feb 05, Melissa rated it did not like it. This book felt like an interminable tale of entitlement and cultural appropriation. I also think its dismissive attitude toward Western medicine, with the mantra of you can heal yourself, is dangerous and stigmatizing. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Amy Scher had a severe case of Lyme disease that left her in a lot of pain, with poor balance, and with an immune system so weak doctors were afraid a cold could kill her.

In an effort to treat her disease, she reaches out to a doctor in India who is doing treatment with stem cells. I enjoyed reading about her journey and how she gradually noticed improvements. I also liked how she stated that this is not a treatment for everyone instead of passing off this treatment as a miracle cure-all. My gr Amy Scher had a severe case of Lyme disease that left her in a lot of pain, with poor balance, and with an immune system so weak doctors were afraid a cold could kill her.

My gripe comes about the part when she returns to the United States. She starts seeking treatment that is so far from orthodox I'd never heard of them: she consults a psychic doctor about whether she's having a relapse, has a test that checks for "toxins" given off of her body's energy flow, and decides she's cured after "unblocking" her energy flow. The ending was really hokey to me, but prior to that, I was cheering on Amy's successes. From Lilac Wolf and Stuff The book is brilliant. I'm in awe of this woman who spent so long losing a battle with Lyme Disease. She went to India for stem cell treatment.

The stem cells used, are from a single embryo that was donated to the doctor from a couple who had embryos made up for fertility treatment. When they reached success, they wanted to give something back. It's a very easy going book, being that it's mostly made up of blog entries that Amy wrote while undergoing treatment. And reading about her healing is just amazing. Why are we not doing this here???

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“A rip-roaring yarn and a dazzling glimpse into a vanished past.” — The New York Times. In the year , James Willard Schultz left the comfort of his home in. In this fascinating memoir, first published as a book in , the author recalls the remarkable story of his journey westward as a young man to the Montana.

It's also a wonderful study of the culture shock when a San Francisco gal goes to one of the largest cities in India, Delhi. I'm still in love with India, but I'm less eager to move there. She's working her butt off to get rid of the Lyme and all the things that go along with it, and she's sharing it all right here with us. My own life has changed for the better and beyond my wildest dreams in the short time I have known Amy. Her story has been pivotal in shifting the way I feel about my own experiences and the course my life has taken. It will not always be in your time, but it will happen.

The New Eat, Pray, Love! This book is quite simply a must read. It's a hugely inspirational and uplifting story but not in the usual sappy way you might expect-which makes it even better.

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Amy's voice is so unique-she'll make you laugh out loud and wipe away a tear in the same paragraph. She's down to earth, hilarious and wise all at the same time and you can't help falling in love with her and the way she sees the world. You just feel like a better person after reading it This is a very special book and I can't recommend it enough.