North-South: Penguin Underground Lines: Northern, Bakerloo, Victoria and Jubilee

Northern line
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Recent designs have incorporated changes to the network, such as the Docklands Light Railway and the Jubilee Line Extension. The map also includes major rail lines used for journeys within London, such as London Overground. It also shows tube stops with access to national rail stations, rail links to airports, and river boats.

A classic that has lost its way

Stations that can be walked between are now shown, often with the distance between them this is an evolution of the pedestrian route between Bank and Monument stations, which was once prominently marked on the map. Further, step-free access notations are also incorporated in the map.

How London’s underground lines were named | Cafe thinking

In addition, since the Underground ticket zones have been added, to better help passengers judge the cost of a journey. Nevertheless the map remains true to Beck's original scheme, and many other transport systems use schematic maps to represent their services, undoubtedly inspired by Beck. A facsimile of Beck's original design is on display on the southbound platform at his local station, Finchley Central. Despite there having been many versions over the years, somehow the perception of many users is that the current map actually is, more or less, the Beck version.

This is a remarkable testament to the effectiveness of the original design. One of the major changes to be made to the revision of the tube map put out in September was the removal of the River Thames. The Thames-free version was the first time that the river has not appeared on the tube map since the Stringemore pocket map of This latest removal resulted in widespread international media attention, [11] [12] and general disapproval from most Londoners as well as from Mayor Boris Johnson. The designers of the map have tackled a variety of problems in showing information as clearly as possible and have sometimes adopted different solutions.

The font for the map, including station names, is Johnston , which has perfect circles for the letter " O ". The table below shows the changing use of colours since the first Beck map. The current colours are taken from the TfL Colour Standards guide, [14] which defines the precise colours from the Pantone palette, and also a colour naming scheme that is particular to TfL. Earlier maps were limited by the number of colours available that could be clearly distinguished in print.

Improvements in colour printing technology have reduced this problem and the map has coped with the identification of new lines without great difficulty. An important symbol that Beck introduced was the 'tick' to indicate stations. This allowed stations to be placed closer together while preserving clarity, because the tick was only on the side of the line nearer the station name ideally centrally placed, though the arrangement of lines did not always allow this.

From the start, interchange stations were given a special mark to indicate their importance, though its shape changed over the years. In addition, from , marks were used to identify stations that offered convenient interchange with British Railways now National Rail.

Oh no, there's been an error

The following shapes have been used:. Since the map has used the British Rail 'double arrow' beside the station name to indicate main-line interchanges. Where the mainline station has a different name from the Underground station that it connects with, since this has been shown in a box. The distance between the tube station and the mainline station is now shown.

In recent years, some maps have marked stations offering step-free access suitable for wheelchair users with a blue circle containing a wheelchair symbol in white.

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Northern, Bakerloo, Victoria and Jubilee Read stories inspired by the four Underground lines that run North and South through city - part of a. North-South: Penguin Underground Lines: Northern, Bakerloo, Victoria and Jubilee - Kindle edition by. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC.

Tube stations with links to airports Heathrow Terminals 1, 2, 3 , 4 , and 5 for London Heathrow Airport , and London City Airport DLR station are shown with a black aeroplane symbol, and stations with a National Rail link to airports are shown with a red aeroplane symbol. Since , stations with a nearby interchange to river bus piers on the Thames have been marked with a small boat symbol, to promote TfL's newly-formed London River Services.

On 14 November , these services were transferred to St. Pancras International , and Kings Cross St. Pancras tube station now bears the text "for St. Pancras International", although it does not show the Eurostar logo. Some interchanges are more convenient than others and the map designers have repeatedly rearranged the layout of the map to try to indicate where the interchanges are more awkward, such as by making the interchange circles further apart and linking them with thin black lines.

The map aims to make the complicated network of services easy to understand, but there are occasions when it might be useful to have more information about the services that operate on each line. For most of its history the map has not distinguished these services, which could be misleading to an unfamiliar user. Recent maps have tried to tackle this problem by separating the different routes at Earl's Court. Limited-service routes have sometimes been identified with hatched lines see above , with some complications added to the map to show where peak-only services ran through to branches, such as that to Chesham on the Metropolitan Line.

The number of routes with a limited service has declined in recent years as patronage recovered from its early s low point. As there are now fewer restrictions to show, the remaining ones are now mainly indicated in the accompanying text rather than by special line markings.

The tube map exists to help people navigate the Underground, and it has been questioned whether it should play a wider role in helping people navigate London itself. The question has been raised as to whether main-line railways should be shown on the map, in particular those in Inner London. More Details Original Title. Penguin Lines — Celebrate years of the London Underground.

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To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Earthbound , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Oct 03, David rated it it was ok Shelves: s , biography , london , history-today , non-fiction , there-s-a-new-music-is-taking-over , very-6th-form-ish.

A part of the Penguin Lines series to commemorate the th anniversary of the London Underground, Paul Morley's paean to the Tube's Bakerloo line is written in his typically 'modernist', sub-Jocyean rambling style. Now, I haven't traveled on the Tube an awful lot, but whenever I have it's invariably been on the Bakerloo line, and I know it's an unlovely — and, I assumed, unloved — thing. And that, of course, is what Morley makes a virtue of. Anyway, the book isn't about the bloody Bakerloo line, it's about Paul Morley. He's good with the stuff about the time he started working for the NME, and reminisces about how he commuted to King's Reach Tower each week, the pages of his reviews ready to hand in, and listening to his Sony Walkman on the way he claims to have been the first person in London to have had one, thanks to a girlfriend working in Japan.

I'm sure I've heard others make the same claim, though.

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Once he gets onto the subject of music, he's off. Paul Morley writes about the music Paul Morley's been writing about for thirty-odd years: post-punk, Eno, and Can. You wonder that he's not bored with it; that he's said all he needs to say, but no. No, no, no, no. Au contraire!

Infrastructure

Garbutt continued to produce Underground maps for at least another 20 years — Tube maps stopped bearing the designer's name in , by which time the elements of the map bore a very strong resemblance to today's map. Charing Cross. Further, step-free access notations are also incorporated in the map. The first posters used a number of type fonts, as was contemporary practice, [] and station signs used sans serif block capitals. I'm sure I've heard others make the same claim, though. Bus tram routes.

On and on he goes. And what is it with him and lists? I would have been disappointed if he didn't write about music, in truth. I'm not really that interested in the Bakerloo line though the historical titbits he provides I did find interesting , and I only picked the book off the library shelf because of Morley's name, and, in the end, I got what I didn't have to pay for. This book by journalist Paul Morley has a very unconventional feel, largely because its principal subjects are the London Underground specifically the Bakerloo line and the music industry, both subjects that he seems to be fanatical about.

It sounds like a strange mixture, and it is. So, one moment, Morley will be talking about the London Underground and its history, and then suddenly the book will turn into an essay about the development of the Walkman and the author's favourite bands, focussi This book by journalist Paul Morley has a very unconventional feel, largely because its principal subjects are the London Underground specifically the Bakerloo line and the music industry, both subjects that he seems to be fanatical about.

So, one moment, Morley will be talking about the London Underground and its history, and then suddenly the book will turn into an essay about the development of the Walkman and the author's favourite bands, focussing largely on obscure groups, with a lot of commentary on a "Bakerloo" track by the band Can.

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The two seem to be linked by talks of sitting on an underground train while listening to music. One of the best things about this book is that Paul Morley seems to be very knowledgeable about his subject matter, and he seems to enjoy talking about it; he also has quite an interesting way with words, at times treating a London Underground line as though it is a human being with feelings, and at times going into flights of fancy that almost make you wonder what he's been smoking, commenting on how the line probably has tunnels leading Jupiter and how Elephant and Castle Tube Station is probably home to tramps and mutants.

There was also an intriguing fascination with the colour brown, which is the colour that denotes the Bakerloo on tube maps, and Morley keeps returning to this subject almost obsessively, comparing it to Sherlock Holmes' pipe and "the colour of hashish". I found it overall to be an enjoyable read, although the two subjects seemed to sit side-by-side somewhat awkwardly.

Feb 27, Roxy rated it it was amazing. Of the titles I've read in the Penguin Underground series, "Earthbound" is by far my favourite. Morley documents his experience of his line of choice, the Bakerloo, from first moving to London from the north in the late s, very soon before the line converted to the Jubilee in But this isn't a narrative autobiographic tale so much as several concurrent stories occurring in different times, and Morley seamlessly fuses different strands of culture from different eras, into one line. The first posters used a number of type fonts, as was contemporary practice, [] and station signs used sans serif block capitals.

The typesetters P22 developed today's electronic version, sometimes called TfL Johnston, in Early advertising posters proclaimed the advantages of travelling using various letter forms. Harold Hutchison became London Transport publicity officer in , after World War II and nationalisation, and introduced the "pair poster", where an image on a poster was paired with text on another.

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Numbers of commissions dropped, to eight a year in the s and just four a year in the s, [] with images from artists such Harry Stevens and Tom Eckersley. The London Underground Film Office received over requests to film in Popular legends about the Underground being haunted persist to this day. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 has a level named Underground where most of the level takes place between the dockyards and Westminster while the player and a team of SAS attempt to take down cargo being shipped using London Underground.

The London Underground map serves as a playing field for the conceptual game of Mornington Crescent [] which is named after a station on the Northern line and the board game The London Game. London Transport portal. London Underground This article is about the Greater London public transit system. For the suburban London rail network, see London Overground.

For the album by Herbie Mann, see London Underground album. A larger sub-surface Metropolitan line train at Farringdon bound for Aldgate. Main article: History of the London Underground. Passengers wait to board a tube train in the early s. Aldwych tube station being used as a bomb shelter in A Stock train at Barons Court. Platform edge doors at Westminster. Main article: London Underground infrastructure. A geographic London Underground map showing the extent of the network Amersham and Chesham stations, top left, are omitted.

The line has been referred to as the Circle line at least since and first appeared separately on the tube map in The Avg. An accurate geographic map of the entire system. Main article: London Underground rolling stock. A sub-surface Metropolitan line A Stock train left passes a deep-tube Piccadilly line Stock train right in the siding at Rayners Lane. A Northern line deep-tube train leaves a tunnel mouth just north of Hendon Central station.

See also: London Underground infrastructure: Lifts and escalators. Escalators at Canary Wharf station. Main article: Croxley Rail Link. Main article: Northern line extension to Battersea. Main article: Bakerloo line extension to Camberwell. Main article: New Tube for London. The Oyster card , a contactless smart card used across the London transport system.

Main article: London Underground ticketing. Main article: Night Tube. Route map of Night Tube. The gap between a train and the platform edge at Victoria. Disabled person on the Tube train. An overcrowded Northern line train. Overcrowding is a regular problem for Tube passengers, especially during peak hours. The left side shows the Beck map and the right side the map as it appeared in An early form of the roundel as used on the platform at Ealing Broadway and the form used today outside Westminster tube station. Roundel and "way out" arrow on a platform at Bethnal Green station.

See also: List of listed London Underground stations. Main article: Johnston typeface. Main article: London Underground in popular culture. Transport for London. Retrieved 17 June London: Transport for London. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 25 October A History of the London Underground. Demand Media Limited. Clive's Underground Line Guides.

South Kenton - Least Used Bakerloo Line Station

Clive Feather. Retrieved 11 June BBC News. BBC Radio 4. Retrieved 26 January Archived from the original on 22 January Retrieved 6 June Retrieved 2 April Retrieved 24 November The Guardian. Retrieved 4 June Retrieved 8 June Retrieved 1 December London: Profile Books. Retrieved 7 December Retrieved 22 December Quail Map Company. Passenger Train Services over Unusual Lines. Retrieved 18 June March Archived PDF from the original on 4 October Modern Railways. Department for Transport. Retrieved 17 March Retrieved 31 March University College London.

Retrieved 5 November London Evening Standard. Archived from the original on 30 March Retrieved 27 March Retrieved 4 March The Times. Archived from the original on 14 October Retrieved 10 November Archived from the original on 25 February Retrieved 12 March Google Play. Retrieved 4 January Retrieved 1 April Retrieved 17 October Retrieved 15 June Retrieved 6 February July Retrieved 23 February Retrieved London First. February Retrieved 10 March Retrieved 14 December Retrieved 24 July Retrieved 19 January Archived from the original on 3 December Wandsworth Guardian.

Retrieved 12 January Archived from the original on 11 April Retrieved 1 October Greater London Authority. Archived from the original PDF on 30 September Retrieved 19 June Retrieved 12 June Uxbridge Gazette.

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Retrieved 15 July October Retrieved 25 June London Reconnections. Board Minutes. Retrieved 3 April Railway Gazette. Retrieved 9 October Retrieved 14 November May Retrieved 11 March January Retrieved 7 March Archived PDF from the original on 26 September Retrieved 30 March London Councils.