Kids These Days: A Novel

Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials
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It is not "sweet" or "soulful" or "funny as hell. Should I have run screaming from it when I saw the lead quote was from Dave Barry? Was Carl Hiaase Nothing they put on this book's jacket is true. Was Carl Hiaasen busy? Because that's who might like it. People who like Hiaasen but wish there was less crime and worse dialogue. Because this guy seems to have not learned the main thing you learn in writing class: Do not have an action and then have the main character tell the other characters about that action.

It's incredibly boring. And it happens again and again. Along with characters constantly asking each other if they are ok. Are you okay? I think so. Are you? I'm not sure. You just asked me that. Well, I'm asking you again. I can't tell. Oh my god, shoot me! Such bad dialogue, absolutely no resolution to the plot, which isn't that interesting to begin with. Worst book I've read in ages. View 1 comment. Mar 11, Sonia rated it it was ok. Reminded me of a Carl Hiassen novel about Florida even down to the cover art.

Jul 08, Tina rated it liked it Shelves: I picked this up after hearing the author speak. He was really charismatic and funny. As I started "Kids These Days" I was enjoying the style and quirkiness, but as things went on it started to get a little confused.

Kids These Days

I felt like the novel was two semi-formed ideas meshed into one book. There's the story of Walter and Alice having their first child, and Walter totally freaking out about it. And then there's the story of Mid and his mysterious, probably criminal business, as well as his family, fa I picked this up after hearing the author speak. And then there's the story of Mid and his mysterious, probably criminal business, as well as his family, falling into pieces. For the most part I liked both Walter and Alice, but their arguments about the pregnancy got pretty old about halfway through the book. It started to feel like they really weren't ready to have a kid, like they needed everything to be their perfect fantasy imagination for it to be ok.

Then I had some trouble visualizing and understanding Delton, Mid's rebellious teenage daughter. She seemed always to be so even-keel and wise, but then also was going through this classic date-an-older-boy-get-a-tattoo phase and I just couldn't place her anywhere. My last problem was with Mid's business. In improv there's a rule that if you bring something up i.

The longer you don't name it the more disappointing it is when you do. The plot kept circling around what was going on and we only got cryptic dialogue from Mid. Walter himself was too passive to go find anything out. He preferred to stare out at the beach immobilized much of the time. This started to leave me suspicious if there really was any meat to all the mystery. I stuck with the book and gave it three stars because despite issues with plot it still had a great writing style that kind of carries you along with it and you're sucked in to see what happens at the end.

Maybe a good quick beach read. Sep 08, Jane rated it did not like it. This book was such a waste of time. When I finished the last page, I kept looking for more pages, and said out loud, "Well that was a stupid book. I think I stuck with it thinking it would get better and everything would be explained in the end, but the main characters This book was such a waste of time. I think I stuck with it thinking it would get better and everything would be explained in the end, but the main characters just ended up at some fair that I guess was supposed to be symbolic in some way, but the author was either trying so hard to make a connection, that it wasn't made, or, more likely, he just got tired of his own story or was about to not make his publisher's deadline, and just smashed on an ending that leaves the reader unfulfilled, frustrated, and grumpy.

Don't read it, it is NOT worth your time!! Mar 23, Marcus rated it did not like it. Part screenplay, part random stream-of-thought, I couldn't wait to get this rhythm-lacking book done soon enough. While it provided a fresh perspective, none of the characters were worthy of any empathy.

Case in point: perhaps the most "normal" character is the underage-drinking, pot-smoking college guy who is implicitly committing statutory rape in that his girlfriend is a high school freshman. Overall, just a depressing look into the lives of people who are imprisoned, though together, by thei Part screenplay, part random stream-of-thought, I couldn't wait to get this rhythm-lacking book done soon enough.

Overall, just a depressing look into the lives of people who are imprisoned, though together, by their deficiencies and flaws. Jan 16, The Loopy Librarian rated it really liked it. Funny and engaging from page one. Honest and self-deprecating voice of narration with an amusing view of himself, his life, and the world.

I could've done without the foul language. There were, however, surprisingly sweet moments where it was impossible not to feel empathy for the characters and to share in their fear and expectancy as they prepared for their first child. There was also crazy drama with riotous humor well-balanced by sensitivity, vulnerability and depth. I recommend this for fan Funny and engaging from page one. I recommend this for fans of humorous fiction or for those who are trying to raise children in these crazy times.

Quotes: "She was skinny in a way that made me want to feed her a burger" p. We stood there like that, not knowing while the whole of the outside pressed in against us" p. I was as lost, I knew, in that condo, in my whole life as I would be in the Intracoastal if I fell out of the boat and had to swim back home" p. In accordance with FTC guidelines, please note that I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review through LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Mar 01, Amy rated it liked it Shelves: general-fiction. This was a fun book to read but not much else. There was very little character development. The entire book is basically all the characters asking one another what is going on and the other character says they do not know what is going on. If the author wrote a sequel or another book, I would probably read it.

LITTLE KIDS NOWADAYS!! - Brent Rivera

Aug 26, Kathy rated it did not like it. Couldn't even finish this book, and that's saying a lot! Maybe this book seems well written to some people, but I felt like I was stuck in the brain of a hyped up 9 year old I tried to stay with it but I feel so much relief that I've allowed myself to just put the book down and not return! Oct 26, Mary Lou rated it it was ok.

I think I am too old to get this book. I got tired of all the wavering about having a child, when the wife was pregnant. Every character seemed to just sit back and let happen to them rather than take charge of their lives. Mid, the one character that seems to try to take charge, screws up all the time. I just wanted to reach into the book and slap the characters and say, "Grow up! Maybe all the angst works for a younger reader. Apr 17, Kate rated it liked it. The notions of family loyalty, children who are wise beyond their years, and how many people are fumbling through life, doing the best they know how, all are woven throughout.

Jul 01, Natalie rated it it was ok. Lots of back and forth dialogue, which can make it hard to keep up, but it also brings wittiness to a somewhat confusing book. I did like the angle of "nervous and lost guy about to be a father" and the angle of a young couple going through a major transition in life. But too much is left in the air at the end that you're not sure what was the point of all the things that happened previously. Sep 30, Andrey rated it did not like it.

Jun 11, Brian Tucker rated it it was ok. Dialogue and repetition tripped me up. I really wanted to like this one. Due to be a dad in 2 months. The plot seemed fitting for my life stage, but the conflict didn't deliver. Jul 18, Kara rated it it was ok Shelves: florida. I think this was an attempt to be madcap and zany, but it just came out flat. May 27, Bobby Nelson rated it really liked it. A humorous read.

Atmospheric, episodic and engaging. I will read more by Mr Perry. Aug 17, John Luiz rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction-for-guys. The premise of his first novel — a wife leaving her husband and moving in with his boyfriend, leaving him to raise their autistic son — was totally absorbing.

I enjoyed spending time with these characters so much that I felt like if updates of their lives were delivered in serial form, I would keep on reading. Nov 27, Harry Brake rated it liked it. Monotone, unclear what is happening and random. At first, these characteristics throw you off when you begin Drew Perry's novel, and yet, as you get used to the characters, everything settles in. Not your typical novel, that is truly what sets this nice apart. By the end of the novel, you figure what seemed tone a vert flat character has found his place and has developed with the events that are occurring around him.

I have to admit, I was completely frustrated with a very irresponsible Dad and Monotone, unclear what is happening and random. I have to admit, I was completely frustrated with a very irresponsible Dad and character found in Mid rather than amused and by the end, glad to see Walter having taken on more responsibility than Mid coming into being a new father. Yet, throughout the novel, I felt Walter was emotionless, on purpose I am sure , as well as harassed when he truly was trying to deal with the new life situations around him, and yes, as well as playing babysitter.

Overall, I appreciated the toned down themes and plot, yet at times, it drove me crazy. Maybe that is why I kept going due to the unusual nature of the plot, yet, there is something that is said and understood about the whole ordeal of becoming a father, life changing with teenagers in the picture, and the interpretation of life around you with a little chaos. Perry is able to take us to a wide range of emotions, conflicts and adventures and truly hits low and high points throughout.

Feb 18, Radhika rated it really liked it. I do not know why I had requested this book , that was my reaction when I got the notice from the library that it was ready for me. Coincidentally the same day while driving home for lunch I heard the author of this book being interviewed and he really was so eloquent about how this book came about that I decided to give it a try and I was glad that I did! Walter and Alice decide to have a kid! Alice is pregnant and happy but Walter though happy for his wife whom he loves has a lot of reservation I do not know why I had requested this book , that was my reaction when I got the notice from the library that it was ready for me.

Alice is pregnant and happy but Walter though happy for his wife whom he loves has a lot of reservations and he is so apprehensive that he cannot enjoy this phase of his life. He is petrified of being responsible for another human being which will be totally dependent on him.

He loses his job and they move to Florida where they live in Alice's aunt condo as they do not have to pay rent and also Alice's sister Carolyn and her family live there. Walter watches Carolyn and her husband Mid traipse the path of parenthood and watches the anguishes, the commitment needed to get the kids going and it makes him more wary.

But as he watches the children everyday he realises that there is no perfect way to parent, no guarantees but only the satisfaction of doing the best and loving the little being that is coming into this world To love we have to overcome fear! Loving is hurting,feeling,joy heartbreak.. Well written story of contemporary America! Mar 13, Astrid Delgado rated it liked it Shelves: beach-reads , books-of So I finally finished this book.

I got a copy from Library Things in exchange for an honest review. The reason it took me a while to read it is because it does move a little slow. It is also all over the place. There are story lines and details that are there to make it unique, but seem unnecessary to the book. It basically tried to put many different story lines into one.

I feel it should have stuck to the story of Mid and the law and to Walter coping with having a child. I feel including Hank t So I finally finished this book. I feel including Hank the parachutist and some of the other details should have been left out. Also while I liked Delton's story line and she was often the voice of reason, some parts of her storyline like moving in with Walt and Alice and the pirate incident could have been left out. Also the ending was disappointing.

Other than that, the book is a nice relaxing read. I love that you can see Walt's personal journey of coping with becoming a father when he hadn't pictured being one. Like I said I liked Delton balancing things out as well as Alice. The second part was definitely more exciting and I felt it should have come sooner. Feb 08, Holly Booms Walsh rated it liked it Shelves: fiction , psychology , novel , family. This was a charmingly odd little novel.

Walter, our protagonist, loses his job and his wife, Alice, is about to have a baby, which is freaking him out. They move to Florida to take a house and a job from his brother-in-law, who turns out to be having a mid-life crisis himself amid the Florida t-shirt shops, alligators, and housing developments. He's got a finger in all kinds of business ventures, each shadier than the next.

Walter watches the barely controlled but loving chaos of his in-laws' th This was a charmingly odd little novel. Walter watches the barely controlled but loving chaos of his in-laws' three kids and worries about becoming a dad and how to be a good husband to Alice when everything seems out of his control. This book is written in a meandering, laid-back, beach town kind of way, which fits the sort of clueless overwhelmed "dude" way that Walter thinks. Nov 17, David M rated it it was amazing. Easily the most important book yet written on the subject.

Any honest discussion of millennials ought to start here.

Sally Rooney’s ‘Normal People’ Is Politically Complacent

In which we see ourselves as the inflection point of late capitalism, or western civilization in general. How will capitalism end? If we look to the daily habits and life prospects of the generation born since the onset on neoliberalism, we start to get an answer. Mom and Dad, I don't blame you. In retrospect, maybe seems unwise to procreate during th Easily the most important book yet written on the subject. In retrospect, maybe seems unwise to procreate during this phase of capitalism, but I still love you anyway.

Don't believe curmudgeonly idealists. The media really is not the message in this case. For a generation born after the epochal shift from a manufacturing to a service-based economy, raised from birth as human capital , the kind of socializing facilitated by Facebook, Twitter, etc, is entirely adaptive.

In the brave dystopia of our present, there is no boundary between the personal and the economic. Every aspect of life is an opportunity to gain a competitive advantage over one's peers. Life itself is a permanent popularity contest. Granted the kids can be pretty stupid with their endless pictures of food and so on, but to focus on this to the exclusion of any deeper social analysis really is a form of victim-blaming.

This book is a devastating punch to the gut. All due respect to Spinoza, knowing you're a slave doesn't really make you free. Nov 30, Jacob rated it it was ok. I would describe it as a series of essays about how capitalism overworks you and makes you crazy, and how millennials, born into our dysfunctional capitalism-in-decline, are overworked and made crazy. Harris doesn't seem to be an expert in anything other than the on-the-ground experience of Occupy. If you want to actually dig into the dysfunctions of public schools or independent contractor work or loan debt or the carceral state then he mentions books he's read about each.

So I mean, maybe as a sort of bibliography? It's a bit too much preaching to the choir for me. If you're a millennial and you're not aware of this stuff then what are you even doing? Trump is in the White House and you're still not paying attention? Damn, dude. And then even if you are within the weird triangle of 1 uninformed and 2 liberal to centrist-Republican and 3 willing to read Marxist analysis of current events There just isn't much meat here.

The one useful point Harris does make is about the labor value of schoolwork, which I don't see other people talk about in quite the same way. We often discount the amount and value of schoolwork which children do, because it's unpaid, but it accretes utility. Kids who finish high school now have done more work over the course of the four years than, say, 30 years ago, because of factors like intensification of coursework and technology allowing for more efficient study.

Because they've done more work on themselves during this time, they can produce more value for their employers. The implicit contract that you educate yourself more to get paid better has broken down over the years, because everyone is getting better educated and we're encouraged to compete against eachother, and also because labor protections have been eroded. This is not a new idea , but the emerging patterns of workers paying in labor and money to educate themselves and capitalists reaping the benefits are explored in a worthwhile way.

The book just doesn't go anywhere! There's no argument running throughout or call to action at the end. Things are bad and getting worse. You should know about it, and be mad. But there's no possible way to change things because they're too bad already. Mar 23, Marks54 rated it liked it. This book seeks to get behind the stereotypes about the millennial generation to explain on the basis of research what is actually going on within the generation and what is not going on - to deconstruct the popular hype about millennials.

Some of the prior comments on the book suggested that the author provided a more fact based and rigorous approach to looking at generational issues. Since I have continuing contacts with millennials in both my personal and professional life and have even been This book seeks to get behind the stereotypes about the millennial generation to explain on the basis of research what is actually going on within the generation and what is not going on - to deconstruct the popular hype about millennials.

Since I have continuing contacts with millennials in both my personal and professional life and have even been exposed to most of the stereotypes, I eagerly picked up the book and looked for enlightenment. My three star rating is generous and likely more than the book deserves. I grant the central intuition of the book, namely that the stereotypes about millennial slackers are wrong and that if anything millennials are too focused and competitive rather than the reverse. I already knew this, however, and I long ago came to the realization that most if not all popular stereotypes are likely dead wrong - even the ones you agree with.

I will try to list my issues with this well intended and readable book. This list is not exhaustive. First, the author assembles and comments on several lines of popular research in child rearing, education both secondary and post-secondary , criminal justice, and popular culture. Think Malcolm Gladwell and you will get the idea. That happens, from time to time with Gladwell although I still read him. Harris has a lot to say in this book, but he has such a broad reach that one starts to see signs of oversimplification - that was the case for the areas where I was familiar with the research and makes me wonder about the others too.

Second, I do not accept the overall narrative that is used to tie the different aspects of millennial life together. In effect, what is presented is a critique of post-industrial capitalism that complains about the monetization of everything, the transformation of most jobs and careers into low paying commodity gigs, and the overall oppression and exploitation of those who end up on the wrong side of the looming economic divide between the jobs and careers that can be automated and rendered obsolete and the small number of remaining elite professions and ownership positions.

I am not disagreeing with the economic trends that Harris highlights. I am objecting to the deconstructionist watercolors that are used to cover most issues and turn them into exploitative instances. It would have been better if the author had given some indication that he had actually read serious arguments about human capital, economic inequality, or technological change rather than listening to the latest podcasts and reading blurbs in front of paywalls online.

The details matter; the arguments matter. Invoking rage against the exploitative system comes across as argumentative flash powder. I could follow the arguments but I had to fill in too much for myself and that made me wonder what the author was actually providing. Third, and perhaps most importantly, generational arguments seem to correlate highly with lazy thinking. The idea that everyone in a birth cohort will share some characteristics is certainly defensible - it is obvious.

The problem is to show that the shared generational characteristics add something to a consideration of the immediate issue. OK, so the middle part of the economy has been hollowed out leaving most low paying and insecure jobs for most people and a small number of lucrative plum situations for the elite overlords and their minions. This is happening to everyone, not just to millennials. It has been chronicled in various forms since before the millennials were born and these trends have been terrorizing older generations too.

What does generation have to do with it? Again, I am not saying that you cannot find an effect for birth cohort in some statistical analysis. The point is in showing that such effects are important for understanding anything. There are other problems with generational arguments. The first is that, by construction, you eliminate the need for policy prescriptions. You only see generational effects after they have occurred and long after any important causal drivers can be changed. Harris dances around this in a concluding chapter but it is more cute than informative.

With a generational argument, you can also lengthen you book at will, adding chapters and topics areas to taste. If it happened to that generation, then it is a generational issue! The material on education is an example. Helicopter parents, the professionalizing of college preparation, and the like have been around for quite some time.

Tiger Moms and Excellent Sheep anyone? This is a problem with the book throughout - I did not see an area that was not better elaborated elsewhere. Harris mostly employs meta analysis of survey studies to draw his conclusions. There are few cases presented to show how these trends come together in a real person.

The cases presented are extremes that are used to further his points. Fair enough, except that the danger from outliers looms very large when the population of interest is tens of millions of people. It is also likely that the survey results thrown around in the book have not been well vetted to see which results are more supportable and which are not. Not all surveys are well done and well interpreted and popular surveys suffer from this. Given the variance that I am certain exists in this research, I am left wondering how thin the ice is upon which Mr.

Harris is skating. Harris is aware of many of the issues with generational research - he clearly says so at the beginning of the book. But then, he tosses the caveats in the trash and starts of on his meta-narrative on millenials. Some readers will remember what authors say in introductions. A final issue that I will mention here is — how could I possibly show that the arguments presented by Harris are wrong? What findings would disprove what he is arguing? If there are not any, that is a problem with the argument in principle.

I had high hopes for the book but found it disappointing. Still, there is enough in the book, especially early on, to make it an enjoyable and quick read. Dec 30, Audacia Ray rated it it was amazing Shelves: audiobook , library-reads , read-in Apr 12, Jack Wolfe rated it it was amazing. This book is so smart, so witty, and so fucking dead-on about everything that it could've only been written by a millennial.

Here's what Harris proposes: how about we look at the Millennial generation the way corporations and governments have looked at them since the beginning-- as human capital to be relentlessly overworked, brainwashed into a hyper-competitive mentality, and underpaid. What he finds is so much more convincing and compelling that any stupid bullshit Atlantic thinkpiece about ho This book is so smart, so witty, and so fucking dead-on about everything that it could've only been written by a millennial. What he finds is so much more convincing and compelling that any stupid bullshit Atlantic thinkpiece about how lazy we are.

The facts of Harris's story weren't all new to me he discusses at length the NCAA players' strike, mass incarceration, the inflation of college tuition, endless student loan debt, the destruction of our environment, the over-prescription of pills, etc , but what was totally fresh was how Harris ties all of these things to our do you mind if I use that pronoun?

The "making" of his title is literal: we were fucking labrats, designed to be perfect social machines capable of producing more than any other previous generation, I might add at any time of the day. We're all sociopathic monsters, and if there's truth Harris's kind of hilariously bleak conclusion where he basically says that conscious consumerism, protesting, volunteering, and VOTING are all bullshit , then we're only gonna get worse.

I can't remember identifying with a book so completely. Every other page I had to shout out some line to my warped millennial girlfriend. Every person from must read this book. And every person above that age group should read it, too Though I understand that it's much easier to just make up dumb shit and talk about napkins and pretend like you're morally superior because of a historical accident that made your generation the first to love the Beatles.

And then subsequently turn your back on Wings, because you wanted to hear more serious and artful stuff like Dan Fogelberg. Great job! Keep murdering your children with outdated gun laws, boomers! You guys rule. View 1 comment.

Kids These Days: The Making of Millennials

A passionate polemic that sheds light on the ways in which our society has evolved to make every aspect of the lives of our children geared towards forming them into better workers. The increasing structure of their so-called "leisure time," the ubiquity of social media, and increasingly rigid academic curricula are all, Harris argues, in the service of making children into "human capital.

Har A passionate polemic that sheds light on the ways in which our society has evolved to make every aspect of the lives of our children geared towards forming them into better workers. Harris on the one hand, approaches his subject with a decidedly Marxist framework, but on the other hand, a lot of his problem with the treatment of young people as human capital seems not to be the darkness of that proposition, but rather, the fact that late capitalism fails to deliver on its promises.

5 and Under

In other words, at many points in the book, it seems like all of these problems would be made okay if only unemployment wasn't so high, or colleges were tuition-free. In a lot of ways, I think he underplays the darkness of some of the cultural changes he's describing. Jan 19, Joe rated it it was amazing.

Bleak in both its conclusions and on the potential for escaping them, Kids These Days is still very much worth a read. Dec 28, Bill rated it did not like it. Born Malcolm Harris, it's not you, it's me. Well, maybe it's not entirely me and maybe it's some of you. Either way, I was clearly not the target audience for this book. Which means that a lot of your conclusions, I disagreed with. That's okay, but let's get a few things straight here that we can agree on: 1. Companies are not hiring women because executives can pay them Born Companies are not hiring women because executives can pay them less.

Bernie Sanders was not cheated out the Democratic nomination. ADHD it not a conspiracy created by teachers and parents to wanted to control children. Not every millenial works for a tech start-up.

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Start by marking “Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials” as Want to Read: Be the first to ask a question about Kids These Days. Books by Malcolm Harris. Kids These Days book. Read 82 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Walter and Alice are expecting their first baby, but their timing i.

Voting happens more than once every four years. This goes to one of my problems with the book. He would say something that I agreed with, but then he would follow it up with a sentence that would stop me in my tracks.

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Or, as happened more often, entire chapters would go by without a point. There was no central theme other than "things are bad". And then he would contradict himself. After chapter after chapter about how overworked and over supervised kids are, he then talks about the amount of time kids are spending on YouTube videos, Vines, and other enterprises. This would have been fine if he explained how these two ideas co-exist, but he never quite got there.

The worst offender, the one that dropped the book from two stars to one was the conclusion. Harris says that "a book like this needs solutions, right". And you know what, it really does. However, Harris forfeits. He names possible solutions, and tries to say why they won't work. Without providing others that may work. One of this solutions is to "drop out of the system", whatever that means.

Overall, the book is too weak, too scattered, too dare I say , whiney. I get it, as a Millenial, life sucks. I didn't need a book to talk about how bad life is. We need solutions. Feb 20, Jess rated it really liked it. I read this after that Millennial Burnout article made the rounds in early January and referenced this book. Hooboy what a read. It begins to explain my experience as both a student and now a sessional faculty member in university. Sep 30, Camille McCarthy rated it it was amazing. At first glance, this book did not seem like it would be too serious, although it did seem like it would address some of the complaints about the Millenial generation and show how material circumstances are shaping the character of the Millenial generation, we're not just a bunch of lazy and demanding people.

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I honestly was so intrigued by this book that I prioritized reading it every night until I got through it. Funny and engaging from page one. Companies are not hiring women because executives can pay them Born Or perhaps When the economic downturn hit, Walter lost his job in the financial world. Jan 07, Lisa rated it really liked it. AmazonGlobal Ship Orders Internationally.

The book surprised me in its depth, its militant writing, and in its devotion to using data and historical materialism to talk about our generation and compare it to others. I already had At first glance, this book did not seem like it would be too serious, although it did seem like it would address some of the complaints about the Millenial generation and show how material circumstances are shaping the character of the Millenial generation, we're not just a bunch of lazy and demanding people.

I already had some knowledge of the differences in the pay scale, unionization of the work force, and the changing nature of work for our generation, but I had not thought about the way education has changed and how that has affected our generation. Harris writes about education as being a way of increasing human capital - a better-educated worker has more abilities and is able to produce more profit than a less-educated worker.

We have essentially increased our human capital, but this increase has translated to higher profits for employers, not the workers, who are getting paid a pittance as wages stagnate. Our society has also foisted off the responsibility for increasing human capital onto individuals, and is draining people of money in order to get a college education. One way this book differs from similar nonfiction books about problems we face is that his ending conclusions do not include a rosy picture of how we can change things.

Instead, he talks about the "Bop It" game we play, trying to change things by electing different people, calling Senators, and protesting, and how each of these things has very little effect and just puts you on an endless loop of doing the same things over again. He is hinting here that we need system change, not just a quick fix of a few bits and pieces. The entire system needs an overhaul, or even to be scrapped altogether and built anew.

I appreciate his honesty and his straightforwardness in this section. His concluding words suggest that Millenials will either become fascists or revolutionaries, but something will have to happen, because we are headed down a path where we are faced with one or the other, even if we don't know when or how that choice will come about. I am glad I picked up this book on a whim at the library, and highly recommend it for anyone who wants to understand the difference between Millenials and earlier generations of Americans.

Mar 14, Muffin rated it it was amazing. I really liked this book a lot. It breaks down in clear language exactly how things are different for millennials than for previous generations, and what that's doing to us. I really recommend this to older readers who aren't familiar firsthand with, for example, the ways student loans have changed. In the end, Harris is unable to point to anything to be optimistic about which is a bit frustrating but it is clear there's only one way forward: full revolution. Sep 05, Margit Wilke rated it it was amazing.

Most confrontational book I have read in a while. Very descriptive and informative but still extremely interesting. Would recommend to anybody around my age ish but also basically to anyone who is curious about the future and how we fit into it as a generation and as people in general. A great read.