Demystifying & Transforming Your Grammar ( an END of Hating It So Very Much!)

Why do people hate this book so much? They should't even be allowed to
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Nosrat, who's been called 'America's next great cooking teacher' by Alice Waters and taught Michael Pollan how to cook, is a more than trustworthy instructor. Instantly recognizable as a reference book, Samin Nosrat's definitive technique-driven tome defies convention. This is partly because Nosrat's method of teaching via the book's four main pillars salt, fat, acid, and heat is a rarity But what makes Nosrat's method so effective was her insistence that the book be illustrated.

The Chez Panisse alum uses a simple philosophy: balancing salt, fat, acid and heat temperature, not spice to create a perfect finished product. But recipes aside, the illustrations alone are worth the price. Learn to balance sweet and acid, choose between different types of fats, understand proteins and heat, etc. This is a new kind of book. Lots of words to live by before you get to her kitchen basics and, finally, recipes more than halfway through.

Enhance your cooking while learning why it's improving. It will instruct, cajole, delight, encourage, inspire, and motivate anyone who is even slightly interested in cooking. And it will make better cooks of those of us who are already spend a decent amount of time in the kitchen. The entire first half of the book is Samin being Samin — an incredible teacher and guide, with infectious enthusiasm for food, good cooking, and good eating. While I consider myself an adept cook, each section was filled with new easy ways to think about cooking — written in a manner that would teach and inspire novice and expert alike.

Well, here you have it. Chef and writer Samin Nosrat got her culinary start at Chez Panisse restaurant and has schooled scores of people, including author Michael Pollan, on how to cook. Samin is one of the great teachers I know, and wins people over to cooking with real food—organic, seasonal, and alive—with her irrepressible enthusiasm and curiosity. So do yourself a favor and buy this book. It is important because it gives home cooks a compass with which to navigate their own kitchens, and it places trust in them that they will be able to use that compass.

It is a step towards cooking without recipes and true empowerment and joy! Samin Nosrat's wealth of experience comes together here in a pitch perfect combination of charm, narrative, straight-talk, illustration, and inspiration. Ticking all the boxes for new and seasoned cooks alike, this book meets you wherever you are in the kitchen, in all the right ways. Students have the opportunity to work with heterogeneous and homogeneous groups. When students work with partners, sometimes they choose their partners and other times the teacher chooses.

The instructional materials support effective use of technology to enhance student learning.

The Dragon Grammar Book: Grammar for Kids, Dragons, and the Whole Kingdom

Materials reviewed are compatible with multiple Internet browsers and operating systems, follow universal programing style, and are accessible on mobile devices. Materials support the effective use of technology throughout modules and lessons and can be easily customized for individual learners. The instructions materials partially meet expectations that digital materials either included as supplementary to a textbook or as part of a digital curriculum are web-based, compatible with multiple Internet browsers e. Some difficulties were encountered when downloading the materials.

The downloads didn't work on a PC using Explorer or Firefox. The downloads didn't work on a Mac using Firefox On a laptop running Windows 10 Home version , everything was accessible using Chrome version The teacher and student digital program were accessible using Firefox version Using Internet Explorer 11, the teacher and student digital program were accessible, but the texts could not be accessed. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 6 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate.

The instructional materials meet expectations that digital materials include opportunities for teachers to personalize learning for all students, using adaptive or other technological innovations. The materials are easily differentiated to meet the different needs of students. The materials provide real time data to give feedback and help teachers respond to student needs. The eWriter includes feedback tools, so teacher feedback is immediate for students. They can view and comment as students are in the process of writing and make immediate adjustments.

The materials reviewed can be easily customized for local use. Differentiation and extension opportunities available throughout the instructional materials allow many opportunities to personalize learning as appropriate for students. Teachers are also able to add notes to the materials. For example, teachers can use Spotlight to showcase student work for other students to see.

Seventh Grade. The Grade 7 instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. The Grade 7 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence, and the instructional materials provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

The instructional materials meet expectations for Gateway 2,in which materials support building students' knowledge with texts, vocabulary, and tasks. Students who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level or in a language other than English are provided with some opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade level standards.

Anchor texts include rich texts and topics that are engaging for a Grade 7 student. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Anchor texts include rich language and topics and stories engaging for Grade 7 students. Anchor text sets include a mix of genres, including novels, informational texts, autobiographies, poetry, speeches, letters, historical documents.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations for reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Supplemental texts within the units are also a mixture of literature and informational texts. Text sets include a mix of genres, including novels, informational texts, autobiographies, poetry, speeches, letters, historical documents.

Text sets illustrating the mix of informational texts and literature include the following:. Throughout the instructional materials, a wide distribution of genres and text types is found, including, but not limited to the following examples:. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 1c. Following are some representative examples of how the program meets the requirements of indicator 1c in terms of overall rigor and complexity.

As the initial read in the first Unit of Grade 7, this would seem to be an appropriate quantitative measure to use early in the school year when quantitative and Reader and Task complexity are considered. Vocabulary is generally familiar and contemporary, and the conversational nature of the memoir is written as a young girl would speak.

The subject specific vocabulary relating to the Chinese culture and politics would move it to the moderately complex level. Sentence structure in primarily simple and compound, with some complex construction e. The meaning, on the surface appears to be slightly complex. Some aspects of the text would seem to be topically easy for Grade 7 students to understand because they could easily relate to many of the life experiences and feelings of the main character; however, there may be a disconnect due to the unfamiliarity of the cultural and political values presented during the Chinese cultural revolution which would cause an increase in the knowledge demand component of qualitative complexity to the moderately complex level.

Example text: "Seventeen years after Liberation, the newspapers told us, our schools were not bringing us up to be good red socialists and communists, as we had thought, but revisionists. We thanked heaven that Chairman Mao had started this Cultural Revolution, and that the Central Committee of the Communist Party had uncovered the mess in our schools. Otherwise we would not even have known that we were in trouble. What a frightening idea! The Reader and Task considerations would indicate this text is appropriately placed for Grade 7.

The text is clearly used to get students into close reading and responding to questions with text-based evidence. The quantitative measure for this text is Lexile, and the qualitative measures are very complex in meaning, vocabulary life experiences and cultural knowledge. It is moderately complex in text organization, conventionality, and sentence structure.

Reader tasks require students to look deeply at race and human struggles. Activities are associated through the Quest to provide more context for students who may not be familiar with the hardships discussed in the play. The qualitative measures are slightly complex for purpose, text organization and conventionality. It is moderate complex for sentence structure and subject knowledge, and complex for vocabulary.

The biographical story of Phineas Gage is used as a lead in to explore challenging scientific content. This leads to a comparison of two more complex scientific theories of the Phrenologists and Whole Brainers. While text features are not extensively used, there are extensive graphics that range from primary source photographs, to intricate scientific diagrams.

Conventionality, and sentence structures are very complex and vocabulary is dense in academic language. The discipline specific subject matter, coupled with intertextual reference to outside theories makes knowledge demands very complex. The gap is called a synapse. It is bridged by signaling chemicals called neurotransmitters. A message travels as an electrical impulse through the axon, down the body of the nerve cell, to the axon terminal. There the electrical impulse is converted into a chemical neurotransmitter to float across the synapse to the next neuron.

The Reader and Task considerations indicate lower level tasks such as sequencing, explicit comprehension questions, and students use paired discussion to clarify understanding of scientific content. The use of sentence stems support citing text evidence in written response to the reading. In later lessons, the students compare and contrast information and synthesize information from the text to support a claim.

Unit E includes Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet which has a quantitative measure of Lexile, which puts it in the grade span. However, the qualitative measures are very complex for meaning, text organization, and subject knowledge. It is exceedingly complex for vocabulary, and conventionality, as well as antiquated structures employed by Shakespeare. The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 1d, supporting students as they grow their literacy skills over the course of the school year.

By the end of Grade 7, students have support and opportunities to be reading texts that meet the requirements for the end of the Grade 7 and possibly beyond. The aggregate score assigned the reading selections in the Grade 7 curriculum appears to increase over the course of the year in complexity. Over the school year, students are engaging with challenging texts in increasingly sophisticated and rigorous ways. The materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 1e.

There is also provided a complexity index that places the text holistically within the 6th-8th grade band. The program uses quantitative, qualitative, and reader and tasks measures to place the unit within a grade band. This is seen within units when, for example, Unit 7C, Brain Science , students begin with learning about informational literacy, and begin constructing an evidence-based argument.

Therapy sessions: Why do I hate myself?

Also, Poetry and Poe Unit 7D requires students to evaluate the credibility of a fictional narrator moving to a compare and contrast essay on different perspectives. The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations for indicator 1f, providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading over the course of the school year. The Grade 7 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. The Grade 7 instructional materials fully meet the expectations of indicator 1g.

The Grade 7 unit has several opportunities for students to respond to text-dependent questions in the form of Multiple Choice Questions MCQ. The units in the Grade 7 are dense with text- dependent questions in the form of multiple choice questions used to assess reading comprehension as well as constructed responses that delve more deeply into the texts. Some text-dependent questions and tasks that students will encounter in the Grade 7 materials include the examples listed here:.

Unit A- For Red Scarf Girl, the text dependent questions are combined multiple choice text dependent questions to check comprehension and constructed responses with short answer responses. Both types of questions require students to understand the text on multiple levels. UNIT C: Brain Science combines multiple choice text dependent questions to check comprehension with constructed responses to further understanding of the materials. Much of the emphasis in this unit is for students to track their misunderstandings within the text, and then to work through those misunderstandings.

Questions in this unit require students to not only use text, but to formulate their own responses leading to argument and informative writing. Some examples are:. UNIT D: Poetry and Poe combines multiple choice text dependent questions to check comprehension with constructed responses, which combines multiple choice text dependent questions to check comprehension with constructed responses. Some questions tap prior knowledge and experience, but then build to deeper text-dependent questions. There are numerous SOLO multiple choice comprehension checks that contain text dependent questions.

Here are a few examples of questions in this unit:. UNIT F: The Gold Rush Collection contains a scavenger hunt where students comb texts by doing close reading to answer a number of text dependent questions. In addition, there are several opportunities for constructed response where students are applying the knowledge gained through the scavenger hunt to new questions.

The Grade 7 instructional materials fully meet the expectations of indicator 1h, as sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks to build to culminating tasks to support students' literacy learning.

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There are different types of writing required within the culminating tasks. Questions, as evidenced in 1g, build their knowledge to a deeper understanding of text and the craft of writing through multiple questions addressing character, setting, and other writing elements. The culminating task in Unit A is an essay: "Choose one moment from the text that shows what she was like before this change. Use details from this moment to describe what Ji-li is like before the change. The culminating task in Unit B is an essay: Identify the theme and its effect on the development of one of the characters.

Be sure to cite evidence quotes and inferences to support your claim. Choose to write about either Walter or Mama. Begin by describing one way your character changes from the beginning to the end of the play. Compare this How does this character act in the beginning of the play when obstacles get in the way of what he or she wants? To this How does this character act in the end of the play when obstacles get in the way of the same thing that he or she wants? Walter and Mama want many things, but for this essay, focus on: Mama wants to improve life for her family.

Walter wants to be the head of the family. NOTE: Focus on just one thing that each character wants in both scenes so that you can focus your comparison on the change in actions across two scenes. The culminating task for Unit C is to develop a research question, research to find information, and then write a short piece in response to the question. With the scavenger hunt format emphasizing close reading of a variety of sources to answer specific questions. Brain Science has students writing a culmination essay: Compare Phineas's behavior and brain to those of an adolescent.

This requires that students pull information from multiple texts. The quest that is incorporated into this unit, Perception Academy, is provides opportunity for debate, however this was not clear from the descriptions in the guides. The unit concludes with a media project and presentation. Students will create an interactive timeline using myhistro. This project requires students to revisit their research to find relevant information for the timeline. Within Sub Unit 4 there is an opportunity for a Socratic seminar. Students create open-ended questions from the texts in the unit to form the seminar content.

The materials fully meet the expectations for indicator 1i, providing students frequent opportunities to practice academic vocabulary and syntax in their evidence-based discussions. Samples of how students get practice in modeling academic vocabulary include work with Socratic seminars and debates. Some examples of this are listed here:. The Grade 7 materials fully meet the expectations of indicator 1j. For example: in Unit 1 subunit 3 lesson 1: Students point out specific details in the poster and explain how each might have shaped how people felt about Chairman Mao. This is a whole class opportunity.

As an example from the Brain Science unit, students move through the periods of a school day as though they have one of the perception disorders detailed in the Oliver Sacks book, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat. The instructional materials meet the expectation of a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects. Notebook structures such as the Misunderstanding Notebook used in Unit C support this type of student demonstration in a low-stakes environment. One Unit selection of on-demand writing includes:.

Process writing builds over the school year. The lessons usually start with a focus on the body of the essay before considering its other parts. As the year progresses, each essay assignment adds a new structural element on which students focus. By the end of the year, students are writing essays that flow from their internalized understanding of argumentative structure, rather than adhering to the rules of a formula. Revision is addressed in the context of authentic writing. An example that sums up how process writing is employed:. Unit F: Students spend six lessons researching and writing a five-paragraph essay.

Students also learn how to create in-text citations, frames for quotes, and a Works Cited page. The unit concludes with a media project and presentation where students create an interactive timeline using myhistro. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year. The materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 1m, providing frequent opportunities for students to practice evidence-based writing.

The Grade 7 materials include daily writing instruction and practice, end of unit writing, and digital platform writing work. Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context. Student writes a minimum of 95 words, and most sentences are complete and punctuated correctly. The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2a. Texts within units are connected by topics and sometimes theme, which is appropriate for grades Students build knowledge via multiple texts and activities.

Some examples of how students grow their knowledge in these units include the following examples:. The Character and Conflict unit includes a collection of texts that vary from a press release to poetry and plays. The materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2b. The tasks associated with language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure are logically sequenced and appropriate in their increasing complexity.

The early units are more accessible due to the more common language and more contemporary themes and topics presented. As the year progresses, students encounter more difficult language and complex interpretation, through the complex scientific texts in Brain Science, and the less familiar structures and archaic language in Poetry and Poe and Romeo and Juliet. Finally, as the year ends, students must work more independently with higher level texts while doing their research for the Gold Rush Unit.

Following are samples that illustrate how students are provided practice and support to understand and grow knowledge around different elements of texts:. Select 10 words from the reading that best capture how Ji-li feels.

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Students analyze different word choice as it impacts and supports the text. This unit then pushes students to use close textual analysis to notice larger structural moves that the authors make across the narratives. Students are supported in this analysis through charts that are made and displayed on the wall. Following are some examples of prompts for students showing how this works in this Unit:.

Some lessons focus student work very specifically on the content vocabulary and knowledge from the topic at hand. In Unit C, Brain Science, students reread the passage that was read aloud, choose a visual representation of the term "myelination," and explain the evidence for their choices in writing. In Unit E, Romeo and Juliet, students highlight words and phrases that offer clues about the setting, characters, and plot of the play.

They then share their findings to understand the how the antiquated language develops the plot and character and shows the larger theme. Attention is paid to phrases and word choice throughout the materials. For example, in Unit F, Gold Rush Collection, students attend to the repeated patterns in the writing to support their understanding of how the text was constructed: "This document is broken up into sections.

What are some of the words and ideas that all or most of the sections seem to have in common? You may want to even just list some of the words you see repeated over and over again in each section. The Grade 7 materials fully meet the expectations of indicator 2c. There are ample opportunities for students to gain practice and build knowledge with text dependent questions and tasks throughout the year with multiple texts within the units. Some of these questions relate to one text and others require students to use information from multiple texts. The strong layering of topics within each unit leads to deeper understandings and integration of knowledge and ideas.

Additionally, this is further supported by the connections between units within the grade level and across grade levels. In Unit A, Red Scarf Girl, students engage with multiple choice text dependent questions to check comprehension with constructed responses ex. How hopeful do you think Ji-li is at this moment in her story? Which details in the Prologue lead you to think so? Use details from the setting to show your thinking. Think of one or two reasons and explain them using details from the text. Students use the story and the other associated texts including the propaganda posters to grow their understanding of the texts themselves and the topic.

Unit F supports students' knowledge through their work with multiple text and types such as Roughing It! Student tasks include having students answer questions and engage in tasks using evidence from multiple texts. The materials for 7th Grade fully meet the expectations of indicator 2d. Reading, writing, and speaking and listening are employed together to support students' integrated skills as they grow their knowledge and skills. Throughout the year, there are multiple opportunities for s Socratic seminars after students have studied texts.

Students create open-ended questions from the texts in the unit to form the seminar content and share and build their new learning through this structure. Additionally, culminating tasks include essays and presentations. Following are some tasks that represent how the program works with this indicator:. Unit A- Red Scarf Girl contains a culmination essay: Choose one moment from the text that shows what she was like before this change. This prompt is supported by the tasks done while reading the text which also focused on a moment in time and the changes in the main character over time.

Unit C, Brain Science: To really develop and demonstrate a deep level of understanding of the non-fiction texts, students practice writing that describes basic facts, explains concepts, and convinces the reader of an opinion. The culminating task for this Unit is an essay: Compare Phineas's behavior and brain to those of an adolescent. To complete this task that answers the prompt while demonstrating their new knowledge of brain science, students pull information from multiple texts.

Unit F concludes with a media project and presentation, for which students create an interactive timeline using myhistro. The materials for grade 7 meet the expectations of indicator 2e. Vocabulary Instruction is embedded in daily lessons. The first 5 minutes of each class is devoted to vocabulary using the vocab. The app focuses on both text specific words as well as academic language. Students start at a certain level and increase levels based on progress. The instructional materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2f.

Writing progresses throughout each unit and a final assignment is to write an essay covering the unit. Essays build throughout the year and differ in how students typically write essays. Students work with poetry, prose, informational and argumentative writing, and narrative and story writing. Each assignment adds a new structural element to the essay so that by the end the essay is flowing with an internalized understanding of argumentative structure.

The O verview section that begins each unit explains the logic behind its sequencing of elements and provides details about each unit writing. At the end of the Unit, students engage with an Essay Prompt: What is one way Ji-li changes over the course of her story? Choose one moment from the text that shows what she was like before this change. In Unit C: Brain Science, students to work with challenging informational texts and complex ideas. In order to help them, the writing in the beginning includes jotting down their misunderstandings as they the read to more fully grasp the difficult concepts being introduced, and the teacher is provided support to identify misunderstandings and skills where extra practice is needed.

Questions and prompts follow a sequence and are then culminated in a writing task at the end of the Unit. Over the course of the year, students also work on process writing, developing components and integrating their writing skills into the units at hand. Some specific support includes the following mini lessons and supports, which occur over the course of the school year:. The materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2g.

There are two culminating research units in the Grade 7 materials. The first one falls third in the sequence of seven units, while the second one comes six out of seven. In Unit C, Brain Science, students practice identifying the differences among primary, secondary, and tertiary sources, in addition to learning to identify the credibility and uses of sources. The primary purpose of this unit is for students to become practiced at reading and writing about informational, non-fiction texts and to learn how to build knowledge from those texts around one topic.

The reader has to distinguish between what we know about the brain today and what the scientists thought was true at various points in history. Students track their misunderstandings throughout the unit to experience what a scientist experiences. Students work through a case study to see how the brain works and then move to more accessible texts and end with a Quest that requires multiple case studies to help students compare and contrast various brain injuries.

Throughout the unit, students are writing short response to compare the case studies and other perspectives in the readings. For the Argumentative Writing section, students complete more research and look for details to support ideas. By the end of this unit, students will write an extensive paper comparing the brain of a character and an adolescent. Students spend time "working like a scientist" throughout this unit. They are given multiple opportunities to explore and ask questions. In the end, they will work on a Quest. Students carry out investigations constructing explanations and designing solutions.

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After researching and taking notes, students use their lists as jumping off points to develop their observations about how Phineas's behavior compared to that of an adolescent. The teacher shares models, rubrics and over- the- shoulder conferences, all of which are fully supported in the teacher materials. The materials for Grade 7 fully meet the expectations of indicator 2h. The 7th grade materials support students' independent reading via teacher plans and student supports. During independent reading students set weekly goals, reflect on their own reading, and log progress by describing and critiquing one strategy they have used and when they decide on another strategy they could try.

It sets out three goals: 1 Making Reading More Independent — This involves setting up and guiding the selection and then letting students decide what to read. The Reading Tracker following p of TPG requires that students log progress weekly in relation to a goal that they have set for weekly reading pages.

There are additional strategies called out to support independent reading such as book talks, teacher modeling through think-alouds, book sharing, partner reading, vocabulary work in context, writing and online book pages for sharing. Suggestions for accountability are writing on shared documents, online posts, one-on-one conferences with students. The instructional materials also include texts that are worthy of student's time and attention and provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that materials are well-designed and take into account effective lesson structure and pacing. For example, in the Poetry and Poe lesson segment, for six minutes students review one scene from "The Cask of Amontillado" and consider how Poe leaves clues about Fortunato's demise. One minute is devoted to defining dramatic irony, three minutes are devoted to a dramatic irony short answer, and two minutes are devoted to discussion. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations that the teacher and student can reasonably complete the content within a regular school year, and the pacing allows for maximum student understanding.

The annual pacing guide for 7th grade appears on pages of the TPG. For example, in Unit B Character and Conflict, Sub Unit 4, Lesson 1, students share the highlights they made in the Solo with a partner and ask each other "What do you think about Pete and Sucker so far?

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials including publisher-produced alignment documentation of the standards addressed by specific questions, tasks, and assessment items. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 contain visual design whether in print or digital that is not distracting or chaotic, but supports students in engaging thoughtfully with the subject. Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectation for materials containing a teacher's edition with ample and useful annotations and suggestions on how to present the content in the student edition and in the ancillary materials.

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials containing explanations of the instructional approaches of the program and identifying research-based strategies. Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations for materials regularly and systematically offering assessment opportunities that genuinely measure student progress. Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations of assessments providing sufficient guidance to teachers for interpreting student performance and suggestions for follow-up.

TE: Rubrics and examples of student work are included, the gradebook tracks student scores, student goal setting. Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectation for including routines and guidance that point out opportunities to monitor student progress. Materials reviewed for Grade 7 indicate how students are accountable for independent reading based on student choice and interest to build stamina, confidence, and motivation.

Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meets the expectations for providing teachers with strategies for meeting the needs of range of learners so that the content is accessible to all learners and supports them in meeting or exceeding the grade-level standards. Materials reviewed for Grade 7 partially meet expectations for materials regularly providing all students, including those who read, write, speak, or listen below grade level, or in a language other than English, with opportunities to work with grade level text and meet or exceed grade level standards.

On these days, teachers can direct students individually to work on the skills they need, but may need additional support from external resources. Materials reviewed for Grade 7 meet the expectations of providing ample opportunities for teachers to use grouping strategies during lessons. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 7 support effective use of technology to enhance student learning, drawing attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. Eighth Grade.

The Grade 8 instructional materials meet expectations for text quality and complexity and alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence. The Grade 8 instructional materials meet expectations for alignment to the standards with tasks and questions grounded in evidence, and the instructional materials provide many opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

Anchor texts include rich texts and topics that are engaging for a Grade 8 student. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations for anchor texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading. Anchor texts include rich language and topics and stories engaging for Grade 8 students.

Texts consider a range of student interests including but not limited to British colonial Africa and Middle East, Colonial America, American Slavery and the Civil War, 19th century science and technological developments, 20th century art, and competition among countries. Anchor texts and text sets include a mix of genres, including novels, informational texts, autobiographies, memoirs, historical documents, and letters.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 meet the expectations, reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards. Supplemental text within the units are a mixture of literature and informational texts. Some examples of text sets illustrating the mix of informational texts and literature include the following:. The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 8 fully meet the expectations of indicator 1c. According to the publisher materials, the range of quantitative Lexile measurement over the year is and the range of scores for Qualitative measures ranges from 1.

It is really not designed to be used as a self-study program. That being said, we recommend working with your student for just 20 to 30 minutes a day in All About Spelling, even an older student. This blog post details how one mom used AAS with her year-old student. It would be very helpful if there were alternative spelling lists for students starting the program at an older age, like your reference to seeing the spelling of emergency and concentrate when learning the rules of the letter c. Erica, All About Spelling is set up so that students are not asked to spell words that contain phonograms, sounds, or rules they have not been explicitly taught yet.

It is taught before students are taught how to spell words with more than one syllable. Because of this, there are not any alternate words we can offer. Emergency has multiple syllables, it uses an open syllable, an R-controlled syllable, a soft G, and the sound of long E being spelled with a Y. Each of these concepts is introduced after the C concept. This is why we encourage parents and teachers of older students to fast track through the lower levels.

Cover the concepts to build foundational skills, but move on as quickly as the student can. Often older students need just a few weeks on All About Spelling level 1, but they make noticeable improvements in their spelling during those few weeks because of the concepts covered there. I hope this helps. I understand your concerns about easy words for older students but, with struggling spellers especially, it is very important to progress incrementally even if that means things are easy at first. Please let me know if you have any questions or further concerns.

Hello, we removed my son from public school before the end of the 6th grade. He is now in the 7th grade homeschool. He struggles with reading and spelling. He is reading and spelling around a 3rd or 4th grade level. I promised him that I will do any and everything that I can do to help him be a better reader and speller. I noticed that he really struggles with reading words that contain 2 or more consonants.

Would you be able to send me a few tips for working with a struggling older reader and speller? It sounds like your son has gaps in knowledge that are hindering his progress reading and spelling. This is a very common cause for older students to struggle with academics. I definitely recommend you begin All About Spelling at level 1. He will move through it quickly, but doing it anyway will ensure he has no gaps to cause problems later on. This blog post details how to fast track an older student through the lower levels so that you can get to the harder words.

It is not surprising that a struggling speller would have trouble with these words. They are definitely tricky. Use the placement tests for All About Reading to decide which level would be best for your son. Once you have All About Spelling and All About Reading, work for 20 minutes a day in each program 5 days a week, moving through the material as fast as he can but as slow as he needs for mastery. An older student like your son may be able to handle 30 minutes a day in each without tiring or growing frustrated. Filling in his gaps in learning will enable him to start making forward progress and to become a confident and successful reader and speller.

I have been asked to tutor a 5th grader struggling with reading comprehension. Tiffany, Good question. Please let me know if you have further questions. My 10th grade son needs help in spelling, and just wants to do a typing program to help him, but I am not sure that is enough. What do you suggest?

Rebekah, We have found that older students that struggle with spelling do so because they have missed a foundational skill or skills that will allow them to succeed. All About Spelling level 1 has specific techniques to solve these problems. While typing, and therefore using spell check, may seem like it would be a help, it only works if the word is spelled close enough to correct that spell check can identify it. She finished level 1 in just one month, but that one month made a noticeable difference in her spelling!

At just 15 to 20 minutes a day, she completed all 7 levels in about 3 years and now I sometimes ask her how to spell a word! Does Level 7 prepare them for college? And thank you, our dyslexic son While spelling still does not come easily for him, he is growing leaps and bounds through your program. Level 7 does help prepare students for the work they will need to do in college. It takes students through high school level spelling and teaches all sorts of things that will be useful in higher level such as Latin and Greek roots, and words we get from French, Italian, and Spanish origins.

Thank you. We started spelling over last year because he was still struggling so badly. Also super excited to use your app, downloaded that yesterday. All About Spelling level 7 will help prepare a student for college-level spelling. If you need recommendations for writing programs, please let me know. I am using Level 7 with my high schooler. I noticed your reply on Sept. I am doing level 1 with my 11 year old son. He struggles with spelling. He is moving through the program at a good pace.

I like the many different approaches used to help him learn to spell. I think he will get frustrated with the auditory approach. Charlene, Yes! AAS 5 also teaches the 10 true exceptions to this rule as well, teaching them in two easy to remember sentences. All About Spelling does use auditory phonetic strategy in spelling but that is only one of the 4 Main Spelling Strategies that it uses. We have found that approaching spelling in as many different ways as possible allows for the best spelling success. Robin, this is excellent news!

Thank you for your time. I look forward to continued success with AAS with my son. Heather, For learning to write essays and other writing, here are some ideas with incremental approaches:. IEW has an incremental approach and has an option for video instruction or not. They have multiple options for essay writing. The methods are effective for both regular and special needs learners. The author describes it as a Math-U-See approach to writing. The lessons are presented in short video segments of 3 to 5 minutes and then the student works on the concept that was taught.

It also has grammar included for 1st-6th grade levels, and optional grammar DVD included in Jr. High levels. Thanks for the helpful post about how to use this program with older children. She struggles with spelling. Mostly auditory and visual connnection due to her dyslexia. Hello Lisa, Here are some ways that All About Spelling can help kids that have struggled with spelling:. All About Spelling breaks every teaching down into its most basic steps and then teach the lessons in a logical order, carrying students from one concept or skill to the next.

Each step builds on what the student has already mastered. Research has shown that when a student is taught through all three pathways at the same time, a method known as simultaneous multisensory instruction, he will learn significantly more than when taught only through his strongest pathway. Working with the letter tiles can make the difference between understanding or not understanding a concept. Students that struggle generally need lots of review in order to retain concepts. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your student needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that your student already knows.

Partway through Level 3, the Writing Station activity is introduced. In this exercise, students write sentences of their own that they make up using some of their spelling words. In this way students have begun to use words in a more real-world context through dictation and writing, to help them transition to longer writing assignments. All About Spelling has a one-year guarantee. I have read the article and some of the comments.

I have a daughter graduating from 4th grade in public school and I recently read a paragraph she wrote and was shocked at the amount of errors in it. It looks like you suggest starting with Level 1. I was also curious if there are other parents with students in public school that are supplementing with this program.

My husband and I both work so most of this will have to happen during the evenings at home this summer. Any thoughts on making this program work for non-homeschooling families? It works great! We recommend working for just 20 minutes a day , so it fits well with full-time schedules and busy days. We do recommend that struggling spellers start with level 1 to build a strong foundation in spelling.

Level 1 has specific techniques to solve these problems. In this case, very quickly skim the parts that he already knows and slow down on the parts that he needs to learn. Pull out several words as examples. Make sure he understands the concept being taught, and then move on. My daughter was 4th grade when we started All About Spelling. It took her only a month of working for 20 minutes a day, 4 or 5 days a week, for her to complete level 1, but her spelling improved noticeably in that month!

She went on to complete all 7 levels, and now I ask her how to spell words occasionally! If you are interested, Krista, I can send you a document that discusses how to use our programs with afterschooling. Let me know and let me know if you have further questions. Krista, I emailed it to you. Let me know if you have any questions or need anything else.

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Hi, Have you got any tips on where to start and how to use all about spelling with and adult ESL learner. I have used it in the past with my children but not for teaching adults with limited English and a non Roman alphabet first language? If it is severely limited, working on building his or her vocabulary would be a better place to start. Then you will be adding in vocabulary building as you teach the spelling. This will make the progress somewhat slower but will ensure a better overall learning of English.

Also, All About Spelling 1 assumes the student has already begun to read at a beginning level, and thus already knows the alphabet and has an idea what sounds the letters make. The very first step of level 1 is reviewing the sounds of all 26 letters. If that is not review for your student, then, as the minimum, I recommend starting there before beginning. He or she needs to know the alphabet and the sounds of the letters first before learning to spell. It would be better, however, to start by teaching the student to read before beginning spelling. Please let me know if you are interested in information about using All About Reading with adult students.

Once your student is ready to begin, go through All About Spelling much like you did for your children. All About Spelling has been used very successfully with adults. If it feels awkward for your adult student to use the letter tiles, it is fine to keep them for demonstration purposes only. Our new Letter Tiles app may especially helpful for that sort of thing.

However, you could also just use a whiteboard or paper with colored markers or pencils to show the same concepts. I hope this helps give you some idea how to begin. Please let me know if you have more questions or need help at any point along the way. Please help! I have a 20 year old son who struggled with epilepsy and dyslexia in school but now is not having any seizures thank God but his dyslexia is such an issue with spelling.

Any suggestions to help him would be appreciated. Our All About Spelling programs has been very successful with adult students! As this blog post details, I recommend that most students start with level 1 to build a strong foundation in spelling.

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Author Unknown [Go Top]. Science just proved them wrong. Each paper has the same score so that you can monitor your general progress as you work with different Units. I may not be very intelligent but I can work out the answer to that question. Marketing research and statistical analysis can help you answer those questions and determine the scope of work you need to do to influence customer perceptions.

All About Spelling is a building block program with each level building upon the previous one. The rules and concepts learned in Level 1 are applied in Level 2, and then those are applied in Level 3, and so on. Level 2 of AAS focuses on learning the syllable types, when they are used and how they affect spelling. This information is foundational for higher levels of spelling. Three syllable rules are introduced in Level 2, and then more in Level 3 and up.

The above blog article has a good example of how you might fast track. The Orton-Gillingham method was first developed to help adult stroke victims. All About Spelling is Orton-Gillingham based, which is why a lot of tutors have used it for adults as well. You might start your search with these sites:. The International Dyslexia Association : Their directory can help you find providers near you, and they have a wealth of information on their site.

A couple of articles to get you started: Adolescents and Adults with Dyslexia Fact Sheet Transitioning from High School to College Even though your son has passed some of these suggestions, it has a lot of helpful information on what to look for in a college, how to get accommodations, and so on. If you have one near you, it would be worth asking. My 5th grade daughter reads at a 7th grade level but her written work looks like a 1st grader. Her ideas, organization and handwriting are wonderful but she just is not able to sound out words!

Blends and vowel patterns are especially hard for her. Do you think this program could help her? Amy, I do think All About Spelling would be able to help your daughter. Level 1 has specific techniques to help her learn to be able to do this and each level after builds upon this. As this blog post describes, I would encourage you to fast track your daughter through the lower levels of All About Spelling. Quickly skim the parts that she already knows and slow down on the parts that she needs to learn. Make sure she understands the concept being taught, and then move on.

Here are some ways that All About Spelling can help kids that struggle with dyslexia or just have problems with spelling:. Research has shown that when a student is taught through all three pathways at the same time, a method known as simultaneous multisensory instruction, she will learn significantly more than when taught only through her strongest pathway. This way, you can concentrate on just the things that your student needs help with, with no time wasted on reviewing things that she already knows.

A motivated student is an easier student to teach. Let me know if you need anything, have any questions, or run into anything she has trouble with as you begin. However, if you have any questions, just let me know. My first time through All About Spelling was with an older student. Yes, Amy. Here is the link to the PDF.

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Let me know if you need anything else or have questions. Kelley, Good question. Children that start All About Spelling from the beginning typically start it between 6 and 8 years old. An older student would be older than that. Some students will be able to complete a full Step in just 20 minutes , but others may need to spend two or three days or even a week on a Step in order to master the material.

I am trained in Slingerland, have a lot invested in it and it works wonders. However, I have been researching this program and I really like it. I am starting a student in 7th grade and not sure Slingerland is the best option. How do I help a student who needs to start over without making him feel bad. If I invest more in a new curriculum such as this, do I have to start over with them? Kellie, One of the biggest differences that you might notice when comparing with Slingerland is that All About Reading and All About Spelling separate reading and spelling.

Most students progress faster at reading than they do at spelling, so we separate these subjects to allow the student to progress at their own pace with each skill. We have placement tests for All About Reading so a student can start at whichever level is best for them. He or she would not need to start at the beginning for reading. However, All About Spelling is somewhat different.

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Most students start with level 1 to build a strong foundation in spelling, although some students can begin with level 2. However, much more rarely a student with prior Orton-Gillingham approach experience will be able to start at a higher level of All About Spelling. If you think your student might be able to do this, please let us know and we can help you with placement for him or her. I have a 10th grader, 7th grader, 5th grader and 2nd grader that I would like to start in AAS. My 10th grader never used the program.

I have AAS level 1 and 2. I have started it several times and put it away feeling a little confused and frustrated, I guess because it does not follow the traditional spelling curriculum. The main spelling that I have used is Spell to Read and Write. I guess I am stuck on spelling list that you use through out the week. All my kids struggle with spelling. I realize I need to start with level 1. For my 10th and 7th grader do I need to start level 1 and go through all the levels or with my especially 7th and 5th grader since they have been through AAR can they start at a different level?

Dawn, We recommend that most students start with level 1 to build a strong foundation in spelling. However, because your students are older, it is likely that they will be able to move through the All About Spelling levels much more quickly than students starting the program in 1st or 2nd grade. In this case, very quickly skim the parts that he or she already knows and slow down on the parts that he needs to learn. Make sure he or she understands the concept being taught, and then move on. This blog article has a good example of how you might fast track.

With All About Spelling, you do not have a spelling list to use each week. It is a different approach to spelling. We recommend you spend 20 minutes a day on spelling , working through each Step in order. If your student can complete a full Step, or even two, in 20 minutes, then do so. If your student needs to spend two or three days on a Step, do that. The program is designed to be open-and-go easy and focus on mastery. Mastery is faster for some students and slower for others. Since it is a different approach, it can seem confusing at the beginning, but after a week or two of 20 minutes a day you will understand how it works better than we can explain.

Please let us know if you have more questions. Also, let us know how things go as you begin and if you have any problems along the way. Where to begin? I purchased AAS over a year ago. Unfortunately, when we started using it both my daughter and I were bored to tears. I thought it must be taught with fidelity, so I did not modify the program in any way.

As a result, we put it away with disappointment and never touched it again. Nonetheless, I decided to give it another try and I was pleased to see that some people modify the program to meet the needs of older students. However, her spelling is more in line with grade 2 she gets it from her mommy , so more suggestions and higher word list or less familiar word suggestion are greatly appreciated. I seems like a great program and I really want it to work.

Lola, Rather than a higher word list, we recommend moving faster through the program so that she gets to the harder concepts quicker. Very quickly skim the parts that she already knows and slow down on the parts that she needs to learn. Older students like your daughter often can move through All About Spelling level 1 in two months or even less, but their spelling improves noticeably in that time.

However, if you would like more specific ideas please let us know what level and step you are on, what things she is finding easy and what, if anything, she is struggling with. My daughter is almost 13, dyslexic and has a hard time with spelling. We are on box three of the Barton program. How would this program differ from Barton? What level would we start with since we are in box 3 of Barton already! Barton, All About Reading and All About Spelling are all Orton-Gillingham based, which is a proven method for helping students with dyslexia and other reading struggles.

Quite amazing! An important difference with our programs is that reading and spelling are independent of each other so students can move as quickly or as slowly as they need to with each skill. We recommend working for just 20 minutes a day with AAR if reading help is needed , and another 20 minutes per day for AAS. We find that short lessons every day are more effective than longer, less-frequent lessons.

This way, parents and teachers can easily track what students have mastered and what needs ongoing review. In this case, very quickly skim the parts that she already knows and slow down on the parts that she needs to learn. Feel free to email me at support allaboutlearningpress. Hi, appreciate your insight in understanding how to help older students who need to go back to the basics.

Jessica, Nonsense words or pseudowords are used in some programs to help stop kids from guessing at words because they cannot rely on memory for them. Nonsense words can help some kids, but overly frustrate others. Marie likes spelling first and foremost to make sense to students and decided not to include nonsense words for these reasons. You could add in occasional nonsense words on your own. However, with older students you want to move through the lower levels as quickly as they can master the concepts so that you can get to the higher concepts.

We are using All About Spelling with our dyslectic 15 year old son. It is working for him. We started with book 1 and he is remembering the rules that we have covered for the 1st time. Kristi, We are happy to hear that All About Spelling is making a difference for your son. It is difficult to start at level 1 with a much older student, but it is best to lay a firm foundation in spelling.

We are going to be starting Level 7 in high school. I believe it was 4th or 5th grade when we discovered AAS. My learner has some challenges and was having a tough time with spelling. We have worked our way through up to Level 7, usually taking a year for each book. We love your curriculum! Loreen, Doing Level 7 in high school is not behind at all!

All About Reading 7 covers high school level spelling, so doing it in high school is appropriate. We are thrilled to hear that AAS has made such a difference with your student. Thanks so much for your comments on working with an older learner. Fitst, with four kids, I am intimidated at spending more than an hour on spelling, which is what it seems it will take me to rotate 15 minutes of more per child one on one.

Would it be possible for me to teach my struggling 5th grader alongside my 3rd grader? I read that we should start with level 1 but can they both do level one at the same time? We are just now making some progress. I guess I need to take the pretest. She just left online public school where sight words were heavily the focus. How does your program implement sight words? I appreciate any feedback. Melanie, First, regarding your first grader: We recommend not starting All About Spelling 1 until your child has completed All About Reading 1, or the equivalent reading level.

While learning to read, students pick up basic skills that will enable them to spell more easily. If you would like more details concerning why we recommend waiting to begin spelling, this blog post may interest you. However, we do not teach unnecessary sight words.

These words follow predictable patterns that students can easily learn to sound out. But the majority of words actually do follow the rules and can be sounded out. Rather, they follow standard patterns in our language. The v and the y both do exactly what we expect them to do. Third, you may be able to teach your 5th grader and 3rd grader together. You can definitely start them together, and you will quickly see if one needs to pull ahead of the other or if keeping them together will work out.

Fourth, teaching All About Spelling to multiple children each day can take some juggling. I also have a high schooler that needs occasional help with Algebra 2 or essay writing. I make mornings about all things English, Math, and Bible, covering reading, spelling, grammar, writing, math, word problems, mental math, memory verses, and Bible study. This takes approximately two and a half hours, and I am working with one of my children for almost every moment of that time.

The kids have assignments and know what they need to do, so when I am working with a sibling they can be working on something else. We then spend another two to three hours in the afternoons doing project based learning together and me reading aloud to them for things like history, science, geography, and literature.

However, it took time, patience, and trial and error to find what works well for us. You can get there too, but understand that it will take time. Finally, I hope this has been helpful. Please let us know if you have any further questions, or if we can help in any way. I was struck that you said you had multiple kids and got done in hrs in the morning. How do you do that? Are your older children able to do their own lessons on their own while you help with the younger?

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They do share Classical Conversations that we do together in the afternoon as well as read alouds. Heather, I emailed you a detailed and long reply. In short, however, the secret is to get one child started with a subject and then turn him loose to work on it for a few minutes while you get the next child started on something. Also, it will take some finagling, but you will find your groove for homeschooling two. You can look through our Spelling Samples and see how incremental each Step is.

We also have a free Phonogram Sounds app , so you can have no doubt what the sounds of each phonogram should be. Lastly, we offer lifetime support through Facebook , email support allaboutlearningpress. If you need anything, or even have a simple curious questions, we are there. Here is what she recommends when working with teens:. They are there to provide fun review activities for those that would need and enjoy them. With regard to the Level 1 readers, sometimes it depends on the student. My homeschooled son with severe dysgraphia is Currently he spells at about a sixth grade level.

Should we start him at level 1, and if so, how long will it take to complete the whole program? Laura, We do recommend that all struggling spellers start with All About Spelling 1, however if he has had experience with phonograms before he may be able to start with AAS 2. How long it takes a student to complete the entire program is dependent on many factors, and age is just one of them.

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A motivated older student working for 20 to 30 minutes a day at least 5 days per week can work through all 7 levels in two years, or even less. However, an unmotivated older student working just a few days a week might need twice that time. Please let us know if you have further questions or concerns. We have had great reports with teens and even adults using our All About Spelling program, and we can help you help your son become a successful speller.

Hi, Would you please help me? My son just finished step one in level one. He has six cards to review, most of them vowels. Do I wait until these are mastered before moving on to step two? I read in the teachers manual that we should work on one vowel at a time. What if he takes a week to master these cards? Tamara, You can go ahead and work on the first four steps while your son is still reviewing the sounds.

Erica, It depends on the student, his age, his previous experience, and if there are any possible learning difficulties. When my oldest daughter started All About Spelling 1, she was nearly 10 years old. She read above grade level, and wrote pretty well, but had struggled with spelling for years. She finished AAS 1 in just one month, but her spelling improved noticeably in that month. In contrast, when my youngest daughter started All About Spelling 1, she had just turned 8. She had taken two years to complete All About Reading 1, was still struggling to read fluently at a beginning level, and had little to no previous experience with writing when she started AAS 1.

She took 6 months to complete it, and her spelling, writing, and reading all improved a lot in that time. Very quickly skim the parts that he already knows and slow down on the parts that he needs to learn. Would it be possible to teach a 6th grader, 4th grader and 2nd grader with level one at the same time? Amanda, It would be possible, but it depends very much on your unique students.

Also, with such a wide spread of ages it seems unlikely that you would be able to teach them together without holding one back or moving one forward faster than they are ready. My three younger children are 7th, 5th, and 3rd grades and doing All About Spelling levels 6, 5, and 3. We recommend spending j ust 20 minutes a day on spelling.

I have twin boys in 4th grade.

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It is our second year of homeschooling and we have been going through the spelling curriculum. Both of my boys can read well but one really struggles with spelling. One of my boys is ready for level 3 but I am not sure about moving ahead for my other son. I have begun teaching them separately so that they are not aware of the others progress. However, my son that struggles continues to struggle in words or concepts we have already covered. Should I return to level 1 to re-cover the concepts? He will not try to spell on his own and when I push some he usually spells the word incorrectly.

For some reason it is just not making sense to him. Any thoughts you have would be appreciated! Jodi, Some children need a slower pace and much more review in order to master spelling. It does sound like you need to back track, but you may be able to simply go back to the beginning of AAS 2 and not necessarily restart AAS 1. Take a look a this page and see how well he does. It will let you know if he does need to restart at the very beginning, or if restarting AAS 2 would be appropriate.